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April Hall

April Hall

 

 

 

Madison, AL
Secondary Teacher

"ReadWriteThink is the very best place for literacy resources! Every lesson combines successful strategies, extended opportunities, & help with technology."

April Hall's Story
ReadThinkWrite's Help in a Sticky Situation

This past school year, the school that I teach at was up for reaccreditation. Very quickly into the school year, our administration let the teachers know that we would be expected to deliver impressive, engaging lessons for the accreditation committee to observe. Since I am a relatively new teacher, this scared me to death; the last time I was observed was in my student teaching. I knew right away that I needed to find a lesson that would impress the committee and still help my students' understanding. I went right to ReadWriteThink. Beginning to browse the site, I immediately selected "9-12" Grade Level and "Collaboration" Learning Objective to better aid in my search for the perfect lesson. Seconds later, I stumbled upon A Collaboration of Sites and Sounds: Using Wikis to Catalog Protest Songs. This particular lesson had everything I was looking for: technology integration, use of groups, content usefulness. I knew with a few adjustments to fit my students, this lesson would wow the committee and my administrators. I decided to tweak the lesson by incorporating centers. After their bellringer and explanation of the lesson, my students divided into four groups. The first center/group completed the PDF worksheet "Protest Song Lyrics Research Guide" that came as a printable on the ReadWriteThink lesson plan. In this center, they researched the history and significance of a chosen protest song from a given list (a link from the lesson plan). In the next center, they looked up important protest images to go on our class Wiki. In the third center, they composed a protest song of their own, and in the fourth center, they met with me to facilitate a meaningful discussion to compare/contrast protestors to Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird. This lesson was really successful. The committee liked its creativity, and my students found it beneficial to our study of Harper Lee's novel. Thanks, ReadWriteThink, for giving me the resources to confidently make it through a sticky situation!

 

I am a fourth-year English teacher in Madison, AL. I am currently teaching 9th grade, 10th grade, and pre-AP classes. Before becoming a teacher, I graduated from Auburn University with a bachelor's degree in English/Language Arts education. I am currently working on a master's degree in Secondary Curriculum with a PK-12 Reading Specialist certification from the University of Alabama. In the future, I hope to continue to develop readers who can take their literacy skills with them throughout life.