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June 23

The first typewriter patent was awarded in 1868.

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The first typewriter patent was awarded in 1868.

Grades 3 – 12
Calendar Activity Type Historical Figure & Event

 

EVENT DESCRIPTION

 

 

If someone placed an original 1868 typewriter in front of you, you might not be able to figure out what it was. With keys that look more like they belong on a piano keyboard, the original typewriters looked very little like even the manual typewriters you're likely to happen upon today.

 

CLASSROOM ACTIVITY

 

 

The invention of the typewriter led to the keyboards on the computers of today. Show your class a computer and a typewriter or two if you can find significantly different typewriters, such as a manual one and an electric one. Begin an inquiry-based study that compares typewriters to computers. Students can talk about everything from the appearance of the two tools to the way that one gets the final, finished product (a piece of paper with alphanumeric figures on it) to the different ways that they might use the two machines if they were composing a paper. As a conclusion to the project, ask students to hypothesize about how the shift from typewriters to computers changes the way that work is done.

Note: If you do not have access to typewriters and computers for the class to explore first-hand, pictures of the objects could be a reasonable substitute.

 

WEBSITES

 

 
  • Kids' Pages: The United States Patent and Trademark Office

    This site includes games, puzzles, links, contest information, and a calendar of trivia related to patents and trademarks. Divided into materials for grades K–6 and 7–12, the site also features information for parents and coaches.

     

  • Lemelson Center Presents Invention at Play

    Many inventions come about as a result of people playing with the things in the environment around them. Explore the pages of this Smithsonian National Museum of American History site to see play turn into invention-and then perhaps you can invent something as you play in the classroom.

     

  • Carbons to Computers

    This Smithsonian Institution resource explores the similarities between the office of today and the past. Related lesson plans, a timeline, and information about office equipment-including the typewriter-are included.

     

  • Typewriters

    This site from the Science Museum focuses on the history and evolution of typewriters.

     

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Paying Attention to Technology: Writing Technology Autobiographies

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In an effort to help motivate students to read nonfiction, students are challenged to use a timeline to help them name the year when certain products were invented.