Skip to contentContribute to ReadWriteThink / RSS / FAQs / Site Demonstrations / Contact Us / About Us

 

 

What’s Happening This Week

What’s Happening This Week

There is much more to explore in our calendar. Find other important events in literary history, authors' birthdays, and a variety of holidays, each with related lessons and resources.

More

 

Book Recommendations

Looking for age-appropriate book recommendations, author interviews, and fun activity ideas? Check out our podcasts.

Chatting About Books: Recommendations for Young Readers

Chatting About Books: Recommendations for Young Readers

 

 

Text Messages: Recommendations for Adolescent Readers

Text Messages: Recommendations for Adolescent Readers

 

HomeClassroom ResourcesCalendar Activities

March 16

The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850.

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 

The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850.

Grades 9 – 12
Calendar Activity Type Author & Text

 

EVENT DESCRIPTION

 

 

Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter tells the tale of Hester Prynne, her daughter Pearl, and the city that condemns them because Hester will not name her child's father. The novel remains one of the classics of early American literature more than 150 years since its first publication in 1850.

CLASSROOM ACTIVITY

 

 

Before beginning a reading of this novel, brainstorm with the class the possible meaning of the title. What does the word scarlet connote? What is the letter? Can letter have more than one meaning? Are there synonyms for scarlet that could convey the same significance and meaning? Be sure to record the responses of the class and return to them once the reading has begun, to explore how students' definitions have changed.

An alternative activity might be to show students the opening minutes of the movie adaptations of the novel first, and then ask them to read the opening chapter of the novel. Students could then write a short comparison of the book and the movie. An adaptation of the lesson Cover to Cover: Comparing Books to Movies (see Lesson Plans below) can also provide a foundation for this activity.

WEBSITES

 

 
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This comprehensive Washington State University site contains links to various resources on the author. Included are some online works, biographical information, activities, and reviews.

  • The Scarlet Letter: The Classic Text

    Biographical information on Hawthorne along with details about imagery and symbolism in the novel are found at this University of Wisconsin site.

  • Hawthorne and Melville

    This page, from The Life and Works of Herman Melville site, describes the friendship between these two authors, who were contemporaries though fifteen years apart in age.

  • Hawthorne: Bicentennial Exhibition at the Phillips Library

    This interactive exhibit features the family newspaper, The Spectator, conceived by Hawthorne as a youth. Included are historical images, portraits, and artifacts related to Hawthorne's life and writing career.

RELATED RESOURCES

back to top

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

ABC Bookmaking Builds Vocabulary in the Content Areas

V is for vocabulary. A content area unit provides the theme for a specialized ABC book, as students select, research, define, and illustrate a word for each alphabet letter.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Style: Translating Stylistic Choices from Hawthorne to Hemingway and Back Again

After exploring the styles of two authors, students translate passages from one author into the style of another. They then translate fables into the style of one of the authors.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Comparing a Literary Work to Its Film Interpretation

Students will really get into the swing of things as they analyze the text and film versions of Edgar Allan Poe’s story, “The Pit and the Pendulum.”

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Become a Character: Adjectives, Character Traits, and Perspective

Students "become" one of the major characters in a book and describe themselves and other characters, using lists of accurate, powerful adjectives.