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August 23

The tropical storm that became Katrina formed over the Bahamas in 2005.

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The tropical storm that became Katrina formed over the Bahamas in 2005.

Grades K – 11
Calendar Activity Type Historical Figure & Event

 

EVENT DESCRIPTION

 

 

Katrina was one of the costliest and most destructive hurricanes in U.S. history and was the third strongest hurricane to touch down on U.S. soil to date. Katrina devastated New Orleans and other Gulf Coast areas and is estimated to have killed over 1,800 people.

 

CLASSROOM ACTIVITY

 

 

The anniversary of Katrina is a good time to plan for local weather emergencies, especially since it occurs at the beginning of the school year. Explore the weather-related and other natural disasters that your geographical area is prone to; then review your school's emergency procedures with students.

Extend the lesson to students' homes and other places they may visit (religious buildings, for instance), asking students to explore a location outside of the school for its emergency preparedness and then report their findings back to the class.

 

WEBSITES

 

 
  • Hurricanes/Tropical Cyclones

    This NASA page includes details on hurricanes in general, with graphics that explain how hurricanes are structured.

     

  • National Hurricane Center

    NOAA offers this resource on hurricanes, including information about hurricane strength, hurricane safety, and how storms are named, as well as hurricane photos and satellite imagery.

     

  • Hurricane Hunters Association

    Visit the homepage of the Air Force squadrons who fly into the eye of hurricanes that threaten the United States' coast.

     

  • Hurricane Digital Memory Bank

    The Hurricane Digital Memory Bank uses electronic media to collect, preserve, and present the stories and digital record of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma.

     

RELATED RESOURCES

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Grades   K – 2  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Weather: A Journey in Nonfiction

Questions about weather clear up when students use what they learned from their books to create a presentation to share with the rest of the class.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Exploring Cause and Effect Using Expository Texts About Natural Disasters

Students explore the nature and structure of expository texts that focus on cause and effect and apply what they learned using graphic organizers and writing paragraphs to outline cause-and-effect relationships.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Weather Detectives: Questioning the Fact and Folklore of Weather Sayings

Students adopt a skeptical stance and become weather detectives who ask “Why?” and “Why not?” as they investigate the history and validity of some common weather sayings.

 

Grades   8 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Responding to Tragedy: Then and Now

After reading several poets’ personal responses to the September 11th terrorist attacks, students write a "then and now" poem that puts their early memories of the event in conversation with their current understanding of and response to the tragedy.

 

Grades   5 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Glogging About Natural Disasters

After researching various natural disasters, students share their findings with each other using glogs, or through poster presentations.