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Lesson Plan

Analyzing Advice as an Introduction to Shakespeare

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Analyzing Advice as an Introduction to Shakespeare

Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Jacqueline Podolski

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Lesson Plans

Calendar Activities

Professional Library

 

LESSON PLANS

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Becoming History Detectives Using Shakespeare’s Secret

Is the case closed on the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays? Student history detectives explore the evidence for and against one of the possible alternatives, Edward deVere, using the novel Shakespeare’s Secret plus a variety of online sources.

 

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CALENDAR ACTIVITIES

Grades   1 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  April 23

In 1564, William Shakespeare was born on this day.

Based on grade level, students learn about rhyming structure, experiment with the Shakespearean Insult Kit, or study scenes from Othello and watch an adaptation of that scene from the movie O.

 

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PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY

Grades   9 – 12  |  Professional Library  |  Book

Reading Shakespeare with Young Adults

Dakin explores different methods for getting students engaged--and excited--about Shakespeare's plays as they learn to construct meaning from the texts' sixteenth-century language and connect it to their twenty-first-century lives.

 

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