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Lesson Plan

Animate that Haiku!

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Animate that Haiku!

Grades 5 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Five 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Kathy Wickline

Kathy Wickline

Tolono, Illinois

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One

Session Two

Session Three

Session Four

Session Five

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • identify the format and topic of traditional haiku poetry.
  • create haikus using concise and descriptive language to evoke images.
  • create a slideshow through the use of Animoto to illustrate the descriptive language of a haiku.

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Session One

  1. Begin by projecting one of the traditional haikus on the board.  Read the haiku together.
  2. Ask students questions about the traditional format of a haiku.  Cover the following areas:
    • Number of syllables per line (5-7-5 pattern)
    • Number of lines (three lines)
    • Typical nature theme
  3. Ask students to circle on the board the descriptive words they find in the haiku.
  4. Show the image(s) you found for the haiku and reread the haiku. Discuss the following about the image:
    • How does this image fit the descriptive language of the haiku?
    • What emotions does the image invoke?
    • Do these emotions fit the mood of the haiku?
  5. Divide the class into small groups and give each group a traditional haiku to examine and present to the class.  Ask them to discuss the following in their small groups and then share with the class while the haiku is projected (write these on the board or project them for students to see):
    • The traditional 5-7-5 syllable line format
    • Number of lines
    • The nature theme
    • The descriptive words
    • The mood of the haiku
    • What image(s) they imagine would fit their haiku
  6. Project a non-traditional haiku on the board.  Read the haiku together and discuss the following:
    • Number of syllables per line
    • Number of lines
    • The theme of the haiku
    • The concise, descriptive language that is present in all haikus
  7. Project the image(s) you found for this haiku and reread the haiku.  Ask students how this image fits the haiku.
  8. Have students return to their small groups and give each group a non-traditional haiku to present to the class using the same topics above.  If this is not completed during this session, give students time to finish with their groups at the beginning of the next session or require them to finish it out of class.
  9. Tell students that if they choose to do so, they may bring in items from nature for inspiration for the next session.

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Session Two

  1. Before the students arrive for this session, lay out your nature items (or items that students provided) and hang your images/photos in the classroom.
  2. Project the Haiku Starter on the board.  Take one of the nature items or images and brainstorm together descriptive words and phrases.
  3. Together, create a haiku using the generated list.  Remind students that because of the brevity of a haiku, not every item on their lists need to be included in the poem.
  4. Give each student a copy of the Haiku Starter. Tell them they may use one of the nature items or images to create their list, but they may choose any nature-related topic.  Also, remind them that only traditionally format haikus require the strict 5-7-5 syllable pattern.
  5. Assign students to write at least one haiku for the next session.  They also will turn in their completed Haiku Starter.

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Session Three

  1. Share with the students that they will be using their haikus to create Animoto slideshows.  Give the students the Haiku Rubric and show the students the Animoto slideshow you have created to compare to the rubric.
  2. Again, play the Animoto slideshow you have created but do not project the slideshow.  Therefore, the students are just hearing the soundtrack you have selected.  Discuss what emotions the music evokes.  Show the slideshow again with projection and discuss how the music and images complement the haiku.
  3. Model for the students how to find images online that will correspond to their haikus and how you want them to save their images.  Discuss the following:
    • Searching using specific words (for example, using tulip instead of flowers).
    • Copyrighted images cannot be used.
  4. Model each step of how to make an Animoto slideshow using the Animoto Instructions printout.
  5. Provide each student with a username and password for Animoto.
  6. Allow students time to work on their slideshow.  While students are working, discuss with students individually with any of the following:
    • Use of descriptive language
    • Images that reflect the descriptive language
    • Music that mirrors the mood of the haiku
    • Problems they have in creating their slideshow
  7. Tell students to save their slideshows, and that they will be finishing them up in the following session.

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Session Four

  1. Allow time for students to continue to work on/finish up their slideshows.
  2. When students complete their slideshows, have them work with a partner to check each other’s slideshow against the Haiku Rubric.  Allow students to make any necessary changes.
  3. Collect the Haiku Starter at the end of the hour as part of the student assessment and remind students that they will be presenting their slideshows to the class in the next session.

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Session Five

  1. Have each student share his/her slideshow.
  2. Allow time for students to comment on each other’s haikus and choice of images as well as music (you may either have students fill out a rubric for each presenter, or provide some sort of guiding questions that students should use to give constructive feedback).
  3. If possible, post the students’ slideshows to the class wiki and encourage the students to share these with members of their families.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Have the students draw their own pictures for their haikus.  Using digital cameras, take pictures of their artwork and upload these to Animoto.
  • Have additional books from the Poetry Books with Good Illustrations printout in the classroom and encourage students to read these.
  • Try other forms of poetry and create Animoto slideshows for these poems.
  • Have students share their slideshow with a younger class at school.
  • Invite parents to a Poetry Coffeehouse and share the students’ work.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Examine students' completed Haiku Starter for completion.
  • Use the Haiku Rubric to assess students’ finished slideshows.
  • Keep notes on students’ participation in group work and time on task.
  • Ask the students to explain (in a few sentences/paragraph) the relationship between the images and the music they choose for their haikus.

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