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Lesson Plan

Blast Off! Vocabulary Instruction Using a Virtual Moon Trip

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Blast Off! Vocabulary Instruction Using a Virtual Moon Trip

Grades K – 2
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Eight 30- to 60-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Emily Manning

Emily Manning

Denton, Texas

Deborah Kozdras, Ph.D.

Deborah Kozdras, Ph.D.

Tampa, Florida

Denise Haunstetter

Tampa, Florida

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

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  • Published Comments

Dia

April 20, 2011

Take a look at "Moon of Kids (Part 1 of 3)" at www.watchknow.org. WatchKnow provides free educational videos that are a little more contemporary than the ones listed in the lesson plan. It also has some free songs/video about the lunar cycle that we listen to while making models of the lunar cycle.

 

Dia

April 18, 2011

1. Please add, "Papagayo, The Mischief Maker" by Gerald McDermott to the suggested book list. You can ask your students, "How do you think ancient people explained the changes in the moon?" Plus, it is a cross-culture book. I pulled it out to close the days lesson because one of my students thought the moon looked like a cookie being eaten. I think it would also make a great opener to the lesson. Older students could be challenged to write their own myth about the moon changes.
2. For a hands on activity, we made a diagram of the moon phases using round cookies, rice cakes, cream cheese, green and blue sprinkles and chocolate chips. cookies = moon; rice cake with blue and green sprinkles = earth; cream cheese = reflected light; chocolate chips = craters. The sun was drawn in on the display. Great for small groups.
3. There are several moon phase lights on the market. I bought mine from Scholastic and use it to review the phases of the moon. For my Kindergarten group, I only focus on 8 phases.
Thanks for the great lessons.

 

 

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