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Lesson Plan

e-Book Reading and Response: Innovative Ways to Engage with Texts

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e-Book Reading and Response: Innovative Ways to Engage with Texts

Grades 5 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Six 20- to 60-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Lotta C. Larson, Ph.D.

Lotta C. Larson, Ph.D.

Manhattan, Kansas

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Student Objectives

Session 1 (45 minutes)

Session 2 (45 minutes)

Session 3 (45 minutes)

Session 4 (45 minutes)

Session 5 (20 minutes)

Session 6 (60 minutes)

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • Support their reading processes by using e-book tools and features

  • Expand their individual reader response potential as they explore different response types and evaluate their own responses

  • Participate as reflective members of literacy communities by contributing to small-group and whole-class discussions

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Session 1 (45 minutes)

  1. Explain to your students that they are going to read and respond to an e-book.

  2. Using an LCD projector and a classroom computer, project a copy of the e-book on a wall screen. If you are using digital readers, place a digital reader on the visual presenter and zoom in so that the device screen is visible on the wall screen.

  3. Demonstrate some basic e-book features, including note-taking capabilities. Explain to your students that rather than writing in literature response journals, they should insert digital notes directly into the text to record their thoughts, questions, and ideas while reading. Model this process, and tell students that this is similar to adding sticky notes to the pages of a regular book.

    Note: To learn more about e-book features, please review "Going Digital: Using e-Book Readers to Enhance the Reading Experience."

  4. Establish minimum expectations for note taking (for example, three notes per chapter). At this point, emphasize the frequency of notes rather than the quality, length, or contents.

  5. Explain that students are welcome to explore additional e-book features such as changing font size, page orientation and layout, inserting voice recordings, highlighting text, and so on, which can be shared and discussed during subsequent lessons.

  6. Ask students to read and respond to the first section of the book by inserting notes before Session 2 begins.

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Session 2 (45 minutes)

  1. Briefly review the plot and characters of the first section of the book. Emphasize the importance of keeping up with the assigned readings so that everyone can participate in the class discussions.

  2. As a class, discuss the e-book reading experience. Guiding questions may include the following:

    • How does reading an e-book compare to reading a print book?

    • What frustrations or challenges have you encountered so far?

    • What do you like about reading an e-book?

    • Does the e-book experience change the way you read? How and why?

    • Besides the note-taking features, which other e-book features did you use? How did these tools or features support you as a reader? Using the classroom computer and projector, would you like to demonstrate your use of e-book features?
  3. As a class, discuss the note-taking process. Guiding questions may include the following:

    • How are the digital notes similar to or different from a literature response journal?

    • How did you decide when to insert a note?

    • How did you decide what to write in your notes?

    • What kinds of notes did you write?

    Note: The goal is for students to realize that there are many different types of notes and various ways to respond to texts. Asking student volunteers to share their notes with the class will likely spark a broader variety of responses among their peers.

  4. Review your expectations for number of notes, and encourage students to write different types of notes as they read and respond to the second section of the book before Session 3 begins.

  5. Divide the class into small discussion groups of three or four students for Sessions 3–5.

    Note: If you are using more than one book, make sure all students within each group are reading the same title.

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Session 3 (45 minutes)

  1. Briefly review the plot and characters of the second section of the book.

  2. Discuss the use of e-book tools and features. Demonstrate a new feature, or ask students to demonstrate features not previously discussed. Emphasize how such tools and features can support individual readers as they work their way through the text.

  3. Tell students that each reader is unique so it is only natural that individuals respond differently to what they have read. Remind students of the discussion during Session 2 and the many different types of responses that were shared in class. Tell them, “Today, we are going to take an even closer look at different types of responses.”

  4. Distribute the handout Response Categories. Explain to students that there are different types of responses, including (1) understanding of the story, (2) personal meaning-making, (3) questioning, (4) conversations with the author or characters, and (5) literary evaluations.

  5. Divide the class into groups of three or four students. (Remember that all students within each group should be reading the same title.) Provide each student with a large sheet of paper and markers. Instruct students to divide their sheet into six equal boxes and label each box Category 1 through Category 6.

  6. Tell students to review and discuss their digital notes from section 2 of the book. Using the handout Response Categories as a guide, ask them to identify an example of each type of response and to record this example in the corresponding box on their large sheet of paper.

  7. Ask each group to report briefly back to the class. Discuss common trends and patterns. Encourage students to challenge themselves to write different types of notes as they continue to read over the next few days. Also, emphasize that students’ note taking should be ongoing and spontaneous while reading, rather than summaries at the end of each chapter. Collect the sheets of paper from each group.

  8. Assign the third section of the book. Ask students to read and respond to this section prior to Session 4.

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Session 4 (45 minutes)

  1. Briefly review the plot and characters of the third section of the book.

  2. Discuss again the use of e-book tools and features. Demonstrate a new feature, or ask students to demonstrate a feature not previously discussed. Discuss how such tools and features can support individual readers as they work their way through the text.

  3. As a class, discuss why it is important to insert a variety of note types. Explain that readers who interact with the text in different ways tend to have a greater understanding of and appreciation for the story. Different types of notes also support lively and engaging group discussions about the book because they elicit different perspectives and opinions.

  4. Provide each student with copies of the handouts My Digital Notes and e-Book Reflection Questions.

  5. Explain that students should review their own digital notes from the last two sections of the book (sections 2 and 3). For each note, ask them to identify the type of note and record its page number (or “location number” if using digital readers) in the corresponding box on the My Digital Notes handout.

    Note: Rather than just recording page numbers, you may ask students to transcribe their entire note under each category heading. However, if students’ notes are lengthy and frequent, this may be a tedious process.

  6. Ask students to fill out the e-Book Reflection Questions handout.

  7. Within the small groups, have students share and discuss their handouts and examples of different types of notes. Instruct group members to offer feedback and suggestions for how to expand the types of response options over time. Collect handouts.

  8. Assign the fourth section of the book. Students should read and respond to this section prior to Session 5.

    Note: Prior to Session 5, review all handouts and provide encouraging feedback to help individual students fulfill their unique response potential.

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Session 5 (20 minutes)

  1. Briefly review the plot and characters of the fourth section of the book.

  2. Discuss again the use of e-book tools and features. Demonstrate a new feature, or ask students to demonstrate a feature not previously discussed. Emphasize how such tools and features can support individual readers as they work their way through the text.

  3. Ask students if they have any questions or concerns regarding the note-taking process. Encourage students to continue to explore different types of note options.

  4. Return handouts from the previous session with your written feedback.

  5. Assign the fifth section of the book. Students should read and respond to this section prior to Session 6.

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Session 6 (60 minutes)

  1. Briefly review the plot and characters of the final (fifth) section of the book.

  2. Provide each student with a clean copy of the My Digital Notes handout.

  3. Explain to students that they need to repeat the process from Session 4 and review their digital notes from the last two sections of the book (sections 4 and 5). For each note, ask them to identify the type of note and record its page number (or “location number” if using digital readers) in the corresponding box on the My Digital Notes handout.

  4. Ask student to compare their two My Digital Notes handouts from Session 4 and Session 6. What do they notice? Are they using the same types of responses?

  5. Distribute the e-Book Final Reflection handout and ask students to complete it.

  6. As a class, discuss the note-taking experience. Guiding questions may include the following:

    • How did your response behaviors change? Did you write different types of notes at the end of the book? Why or why not?

    • How can notes support readers in comprehending and making sense of the story?

    • How did you decide when to insert a note?

    • How did you decide what to write?

  7. As a class, discuss the overall e-book reading experience. Guiding questions may include the following:

    • How has your opinion of reading an e-book changed throughout this experience?

    • What are some advantages and disadvantages of e-books?

    • Which e-book features did you use? How did these tools support you as a reader?

    • In the future, would you prefer to read e-books or print texts? Explain.
  8. Collect handouts. Review and provide written feedback.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Encourage students to explore websites that offer e-books and search for desirable titles for future reading experiences. In addition to selecting books that meet their unique needs as readers (reading levels, interests, etc.), ask students to consider reader software and available e-book features.

  • Next time students read a print book, ask them to use sticky notes to respond to the text. Discuss how this process is similar to and different from inserting digital notes.

  • Ask students to choose a piece of their own writing to convert into e-book format using Microsoft Word, Publisher, PowerPoint, or other publishing software. Encourage students to insert hyperlinks, illustrations, and media files such as music and video.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • During whole-class discussions, pay close attention to students’ comments and questions and address any misconceptions or queries immediately. Keep informal anecdotal records of conversation topics that you may want to revisit during a later session.

  • At the end of Session 4, collect My Digital Notes and e-Book Reflection Questions. Assess students’ responses and types of digital notes. Through suggestive but not demanding comments, encourage individual students to explore different types of responses during future reading and responding sessions.

  • At the end of Session 6, collect My Digital Notes and e-Book Final Reflection. Review individual goals from Session 4 and note the progress toward achieving these goals. Review the types of responses used by individual students and compare them to those reported in Session 4. Offer feedback to individual students.

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