Skip to contentContribute to ReadWriteThink / RSS / FAQs / Site Demonstrations / Contact Us / About Us

 

 

Contribute to ReadWriteThink

ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you.

More

 

Professional Development

Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals.

More

 

Did You Know?

Your students can save their work with Student Interactives.

More more

HomeClassroom ResourcesLesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Book Report Alternative: Hooking a Reader with a Book Cover

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 

Book Report Alternative: Hooking a Reader with a Book Cover

Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Five 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Cassandra Love

Asheville, North Carolina

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One

Session Two

Session Three

Session Four

Session Five

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • analyze the cover art of a book prior to reading it to anticipate what the book will be about and whether they will enjoy it.

  • identify key elements in a book they have read.

  • analyze the cover art of a book after reading it to determine whether key elements of the book were conveyed in the cover art.

  • redesign the cover of a book they have read to convey key elements of the book to potential readers.

back to top

 

Session One

  1. Show students the front cover of the book you have selected. Lead students in a discussion of the properties of the cover art.

    • What colors are used? What feeling do these colors convey?

    • What images are used? Are the images symbolic or realistic?

    • Do the images depict places, people, or actions?

    • If the cover art is a clue to what is inside the book, do students think it gives a clue about the setting, characters, theme, or plot of the book?

    • Do students like the cover art? Does the cover art make them want to read the book?

    • What is the title of the book?
  2. After closely examining the front cover, ask students to anticipate what the book might be about.

    • What do students think the book is about? On what do they base this opinion?

    • What genre is the book? Is it fiction, non-fiction, mystery, etc? What clues does the front cover offer about genre?

    • Who is the audience? Is it written for children, teens, or adults? Why do they think so?
  3. After students have commented on the cover art, examine the rest of the book cover or jacket, pointing out the various features as discussed in the Book Cover Guide. Based on the rest of the information from the book cover, were their original ideas about the book correct? Is this a book they think they would like to read?

back to top

 

Session Two

  1. Have students look through the books you have gathered, looking only at the front cover art, and select one they think they would like to read.

  2. Pass out a copy of the Book Cover Art Notes to each student. Students should use the handout to make notes about the front cover art and to anticipate what the book might be about based on the cover art.

  3. When students have finished making notes, they should use those notes to write two short paragraphs detailing what they like about the cover art and/or why they selected the book and what they anticipate the book will be about.

  4. When students have finished writing, they can examine the rest of the book cover or jacket and decide whether they want to read the book. If not, they should select another book to read and make notes about the cover art of that book.

  5. Allow time for students to read their books in and out of class before beginning the next session.

back to top

 

Session Three

  1. Explain to students that they are going to use what they now know of the book, after having read it, to re-evaluate the book cover art.

  2. Pass out a copy of the Book Review Web handout to each student. Alternatively, students can use the interactive ReadWriteThink Webbing Tool. Ask students to brainstorm the most important or memorable aspects of their book, using the Book Review Web. They should focus on aspects such as the setting, characters, plot, and theme.

  3. After students have finished brainstorming, they should look back at the web and highlight one or two key elements they think should be conveyed to potential readers through the cover art.

  4. Next, pass out copies of the Post-Reading Book Cover Analysis and Sample Book Cover Analysis handouts to each student. Students should complete the handout using both the original, pre-reading analysis they did of the book's cover art and the web they completed after reading the book.

  5. Have students hand in their work when they have finished. Review students' work and make any comments or suggestions before beginning the next session.

back to top

 

Session Four

  1. Explain to students that they are going to design a new cover for the book they read. The cover should be designed to attract readers to the book, but it should also give potential readers enough information-both in imagery and in words-to help them decide whether it is a book they think they would enjoy reading.

  2. Before beginning, students should familiarize themselves with the parts of a book cover using the Book Cover Guide. After students have reviewed the guide, allow time for them to browse through books, either in the classroom, online at Amazon.com, or at a publisher's Website, and examine the variations possible on the front cover, back covers, flaps, and spines.

  3. Students may also wish to read about how color is "read" at Reading the World of Color or one of the other Web resources as they plan the colors to use in their cover art.

  4. After students have familiarized themselves with the various parts of the book cover, pass out a copy of the Book Cover Creator Planning Sheets to each student. Students should use the sheet to plan out the parts of the book cover prior to using the interactive tool.

  5. Pass out a copy of the Book Cover Checklist to each student. As they work, students can use the checklist to make sure they include all the important elements of the book cover. Remind students to refer to the handouts they used to analyze the original book cover and to identify elements they felt should be covered in their redesigned book cover.

  6. When students have finished, have them turn in their planning sheets. Review the planning sheets and make any comments or suggests prior to beginning the next session.

back to top

 

Session Five

  1. After they have reviewed any comments or suggestions, students should use the Book Cover Creator interactive to redesign the cover of their book.

  2. Remind students to refer to the checklist to make sure all important elements are included.

  3. After students have finished their book covers and printed them out, display the finished products in the classroom.

  4. Allow students time to browse the book covers and use them to select another book to read.

back to top

 

EXTENSIONS

  • Have students create a book cover for a sequel to a book they have read. How will the characters or setting have changed and how can they reflect that change in the cover?

  • Many books include different cover art with new editions of the book. With students, compare two versions of book covers for the same book. How are they different? Which is more appealing? Which gets across the key ideas of the book better? Why might the cover art have been changed for the newer edition?

  • Having students use each other's book covers to select another book to read will naturally create small groups of students who have read the same self-selected book. Take advantage of this opportunity to allow students to form informal book discussion groups.

back to top

 

STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

back to top