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Home Classroom Resources Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Building Phonemic Awareness With Phoneme Isolation

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Grades K – 2
Lesson Plan Type Recurring Lesson
Estimated Time Three 25-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Sarah Dennis-Shaw

Avon, Massachusetts

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

In this phonemic awareness lesson designed for a first-grade classroom, students engage in games and chants to recognize the same sounds in different words. Students match objects with the same beginning or ending sound, identify whether a given sound occurs at the beginning or ending of a word, and connect phonemes with graphemes.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Yopp, H.K., & Yopp, R.H. (2000). Supporting phonemic awareness development in the classroom. The Reading Teacher, 54, 130143.

  • Phonemic awareness, which is the awareness that speech consists of a sequence of sounds, should be a priority in early reading instruction.

  • Phonemic awareness instruction should provide students with "linguistic stimulation in the form of storytelling, word games, rhymes, and riddles."

  • Phonemic awareness instruction should move from rhyming words to smaller units of sound, and finally to individual phonemes

  • Phonemic awareness instruction can be strictly oral or may include some sort of concrete cue.

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