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Lesson Plan

A Case for Reading - Examining Challenged and Banned Books

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A Case for Reading - Examining Challenged and Banned Books

Grades 3 – 10
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Lisa Storm Fink

Lisa Storm Fink

Urbana, Illinois

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One

Session Two

Session Three

Session Four

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • be exposed to the issues of censorship, challenged, or banned books.
  • examine issues of censorship as it relates to a specific literature title.
  • critically evaluate books based on relevancy, biases, and errors.
  • develop and support a position on a particular book by writing a persuasive essay about their chosen title.

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Session One

  1. Display a selection of banned or challenged books in a prominent place in your classroom. Include in this selection books meant for children and any included in the school curriculum. Ask students to speculate on what these books have in common.
  2. Explain to the students that these books have been "censored."  Ask students to brainstorm a definition of censorship and record the students' ideas on the board or chart paper. When you have come up with a definition the group agrees on, have students record the definition.
  3. Brainstorm ways in which things are censored for them already and who controls what is censored and how. Examples include Internet filtering, ratings on movies, video games, music, and self-censoring (choosing to watch only 1 news show or choosing not to read a certain type of book).  Discuss circumstances in which censorship would be necessary, if any, with the students.
  4. Provide the students’ definitions for challenged books as well as banned books. (Share these American Library Association definitions: “A challenge is an attempt to remove or restrict materials based upon the objections of a person or group. A banning is the removal of those materials.”)
  5. After the students have seen the ALA definition, have the students “grow” in their own definitions. Ask them to revisit their definition and align it with the one presented by the American Library Association.
  6. Invite the students to brainstorm any books that they have heard of that have been challenged or banned from schools or libraries. Ask them if they know why those books were found to be controversial.
  7. Students should then brainstorm titles of other books that they feel could possibly be challenged or banned from their school collection.  Allow time for students to share these titles with their classmates and offer an explanation of why they think these titles could possibly be challenged or banned.
  8. Share with the students a list of banned books.
  9. Take an informal poll to see how many books from the list the students have read or heard about. Elicit their responses to the books on the list:
    • Did they find them to be entertaining, informative, beneficial or objectionable?
    • Can they suggest reasons why someone would object to elementary, middle school or high school students reading these books?
  10. If desired, complete the session by allowing students to learn more about Banned Books Week, additional challenged/banned books, and cases involving First Amendment Rights.

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Session Two

  1. From a teacher-selected list of grade-appropriate books from the Challenged Children's Books list, have groups of students select one of the books to read in literature circles, traditional reading groups, or through read-alouds.
  2. As the students read, ask them to pay particular attention to the features in the books that may have made them controversial. As students find quotes/parts of the book that they find to be controversial, they should add them to their T-Chart, along with an explanation of why they think that this area could be controversial.  On the left side of their T-Chart, they will list the quote or section of the book (with page numbers); on the right side of the T-Chart, they will write their thoughts on why this area could be seen as controversial.
  3. You may also choose to invite the students to use bookmarks (in addition to or instead of the T-Chart) , so they can record page numbers and passages as they read.

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Session Three

  1. After the students have completed the reading of their book, have a group or class discussion on the students' findings that they recorded on their bookmarks or T-Chart.
  2. Next, explain to students that they will be writing a persuasive piece stating what they believe should be done with the book that has been challenged. If students read the book in groups, they could write a team response.
  3. Share the Persuasive Writing Rubric to explore the requirements of the assignment in more detail and allow for students' questions about the assignment.
  4. Demonstrate the Persuasion Map and work through a sample book challenge to show students how to use the tool to structure their essays.
  5. Provide students with access to computers, and allow students the remainder of class to work with the Persuasion Map as a brainstorming tool and to guide them through work on their papers.  If computer access is a problem, you may provide students with print copies of the Persuasion Map Printout.
  6. Encourage students to share their thoughts and opinions with the class as they work on their drafts.  Students should print out their work at the end of the session.

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Session Four

  1. Invite students to share their persuasive pieces with the rest of the class. It is their job to persuade teachers, librarians, or administrators to keep the book in their collection, remove the book from their collection, or add the book to their collection.
  2. For an authentic sharing session, invite parents in for a panel discussion while the children present their thoughts and opinions on the matter of challenged and banned books.
  3. Students can discuss the books after each presentation to draw conclusions about each title and about censorship and challenges overall.

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EXTENSIONS

  • If the students read their selected books in Literature Circles, the group members can take on the following roles:
    Concerned Parent
    The concerned parent is interested in how controversial materials affect school children. The concerned parent wants to maintain a healthy learning environment for students.

    Classroom Teacher
    The Classroom Teacher needs to select books that will both match the interests of the students and also meet the requirements of the curriculum. The Classroom Teacher needs to listen to the parents, and also follow the rules of the school.

    School Library Media Specialist
    The School Library Media Specialist selects library materials based on the curriculum and reading interests the students in the school.

    School Lawyer
    The School Lawyer is concerned about how the students’ civil liberties would be affected if the School Board decided to ban books.
  • Students can elicit responses and reactions from peers, teachers, administrators, librarians, the author, and parents in regards to the particular book they are researching. Ask students to focus on the appropriateness of the book in reference to an elementary school collection.

  • Discuss Board of Education, Island Trees Union Free School District v. Pico and how after the decision from that court case public school districts around the country developed policies concerning book challenges in elementary, middle, and high school libraries.

  • Students can play the role of the librarian and decide where a challenged/banned book should be shelved. For example, the challenged book may be a picture book, but the “librarian” might decide that the book should instead be shelved in the Teacher Resource Section of the library. An alternative for Sessions Three and Four for this lesson plan is to ask students to write persuasive essays explaining where the book should be shelved and why it should be shelved there.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • As students discuss censorship and challenged/banned books, and as they read their selected text, listen for comments that indicate they are identifying specific examples from the story that connect to the information they have learned (you should also check for evidence of this on their bookmarks or T-Chart). The connections that they make between the details in the novel and the details they choose as their supporting reasons for their persuasive piece will reveal their understanding and engagement with the books.
  • Monitor student interaction and progress during any group work to assess social skills and assist any students having problems.
  • Respond to the content and quality of students’ thoughts in their final reflections on the project. Look for indications that the student provides supporting evidence for the reflections, thus applying the lessons learned from the work with the Persuasion Map.
  • Assess students’ persuasive writing piece using the rubric.

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