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HomeClassroom ResourcesLesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Comparing a Literary Work to Its Film Interpretation

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 
Grades 9 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Five 60-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Lisa L. Owens

Lisa L. Owens

Issaquah, Washington

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Lesson Plans

Student Interactives

Calendar Activities

Professional Library

 

LESSON PLANS

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Storyboarding the Transformation from Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde

Students imagine and storyboard their own vision of the transformation of Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde and then evaluate movie portrayals.

 

Grades   8 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

From Text to Film: Exploring Classic Literature Adaptations

Students create storyboards to compare and contrast a book and its film adaptation.

 

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STUDENT INTERACTIVES

Grades   3 – 12  |  Student Interactive  |  Organizing & Summarizing

Persuasion Map

The Persuasion Map is an interactive graphic organizer that enables students to map out their arguments for a persuasive essay or debate.

 

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CALENDAR ACTIVITIES

Grades   7 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  January 3

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was born on this day.

Students compare the film versions of The Lord of the Rings and Tolkien's novels. Students then imagine how a scene in a current novel that they are reading would be filmed.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  March 16

The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850.

Students brainstorm the possible meaning of the title The Scarlet Letter and what its significance might be. The class' responses are returned to once the reading has begun to see how their definitions have changed.

 

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PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY

Grades   9 – 12  |  Professional Library  |  Book

Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom

In this practical guide, John Golden makes direct links between film and literary study by addressing reading strategies (e.g., predicting, responding, questioning) and key aspects of textual analysis.

 

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