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HomeClassroom ResourcesLesson Plans

Lesson Plan

The Connection Between Poetry and Music

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 
Grades 3 – 5
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Six 30-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Rebecca Olien

Rebecca Olien

Ashland, Oregon

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Materials and Technology

Student Interactives

Printouts

Websites

Preparation

 

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

  • Rhythm instruments
  • Computers with Internet access
  • LCD display monitor (optional)

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STUDENT INTERACTIVES

Line Break Explorer

Grades   3 – 8  |  Student Interactive  |  Writing Poetry

Line Break Explorer

The interactive explores the ways that poets choose line breaks in their writing. After viewing the demonstration, students are invited to experiment with line breaks themselves.

 

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PRINTOUTS

Poetry List

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WEBSITES

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PREPARATION

1. Collect poetry books and choose specific poems from them to share with the class (the Poetry List offers suggested books). Pick three or four poems with a strong rhythm to read aloud to students; practice reading them.

2. Collect rhythm instruments, such as rhythm sticks, shakers, drums, and tambourines. You can borrow instruments from the music teacher or make simple shakers with rice and dried beans in film canisters.

3. Make sure that students have permission to use the Internet, following your school policy. If you need to, reserve two 30-minute sessions in your school's computer lab. These do not need to be on consecutive days (see Sessions 3 and 4).

4. Familiarize yourself with the Giggle Poetry and Poetry for Kids websites. Go through the steps of Line Break Explorer, jotting down answers to the questions. Bookmark all three websites on your classroom or lab computers.

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