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Home Classroom Resources Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Creative Writing Through Wordless Picture Books

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Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 45-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Laurie A. Henry, Ph.D.

Laurie A. Henry, Ph.D.

Lexington, Kentucky

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

Wordless picture books offer a wonderful foundation for creative writing. Often, students struggle with ideas and topics for writing. This genre of books offers a platform for students to develop their writing skills. In this lesson, students are exposed to wordless picture books and begin developing story lines orally and in writing. Educators can easily incorporate various instructional strategies into students' writing, such as use of dialogue, setting development, character descriptions, sequencing of events, and story development. An online, interactive story map is used to assist students in developing story lines.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Interactive Story Map: Students will love this interactive resource that helps them generate story ideas.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Cassady, J.K. (1998). Wordless books: No-risk tools for inclusive middle-grade classrooms. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 41, 428432.

  • David Wiesner (author of Tuesday) identifies one of the most valuable characteristics of wordless books-the endless possibilities for creative interpretations.

  • Wordless books enhance creativity, vocabulary, and language development for readers of all ages, at all stages of cognitive development, and in all content areas.

  • The creativity stimulated by wordless books encourages older students to look more closely at story details, to carefully consider all story elements, and to more clearly understand how text is organized so that a story develops.

 

Reese, C. (1996). Story development using wordless picture books. The Reading Teacher, 50, 172173.

  • Through discussion and critical examination of the details of the illustrations, students wrote sentences that effectively complemented the pictures.

  • Students were able to build their reading and writing skills and strategies to ultimately produce a unique book.

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