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Lesson Plan

Doodle Splash: Using Graphics to Discuss Literature

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Doodle Splash: Using Graphics to Discuss Literature

Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Five 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Patricia Schulze

Yankton, South Dakota

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Sessions One and Two: Reading and Journaling

Sessions Three and Four: Constructing Group Graphics

Session Five: Publication and Summation

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • indicate personal preferences by self-selecting a short story from a teacher-provided list of stories by a common author.

  • demonstrate understanding of the elements of the short story.

  • work in cooperative groups to create a graphic display of their story.

  • present their group graphic to the whole class to demonstrate knowledge of the elements of fiction.

  • participate in whole-class discussion of the themes developed in the various stories.

  • [for the extension] write cooperative group essays analyzing the themes developed by the author studied.

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Sessions One and Two: Reading and Journaling

  1. Introduce students to short stories by a common author. Have three to four copies of each story available.

  2. Allow students to self-select stories.

  3. Put students in groups of three to four according to the story they have selected.

  4. Hand out the Doodle Splash handout and give them an overview of the final project.

  5. Review the elements of fiction with students.

  6. Introduce the Doodle Splash student interactive either through an LCD projector or at each of their computer stations if available.

  7. Have students practice doodling online, individually and in groups, for a short time before beginning reading.

  8. Give students the rest of the class and another class period to read their story and complete their online doodles or doodle journals.

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Sessions Three and Four: Constructing Group Graphics

  1. When students have completed reading and doodling, have them meet in groups to construct their Doodle Splash.

  2. Students compare doodles and decide which doodles will best tell their story. Each student must be represented on the Doodle Splash. Each element of the short story must be covered on the Doodle Splash as well.

  3. Using butcher paper or newsprint and crayons or markers, groups create their Doodle Splash graphic.

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Session Five: Publication and Summation

  1. After all groups have finished their graphics, have them take turns presenting their Doodle Splash to their classmates, emphasizing how the visual representation connects with the elements of fiction, particularly theme.

  2. Display students Doodle Splashes on a bulletin board or a wall, or photograph them with a digital camera and publish on the class or school Website.

  3. End the lesson with whole-class discussion of the themes that the author developed in the short stories.

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EXTENSIONS

Have students write group essays analyzing the themes the author developed in the short story they chose.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Students should self-assess using the Student Reflective Assessment. Each student should do this individually.
  • Groups can self-assess using the Group Reflective Assessment.
  • Teachers can choose whether or not to assess this activity, but they could evaluate the process and the final Doodle Splash by keeping anecdotal records of students' participation. They may also wish to use the Participation Checklist.

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