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Lesson Plan

Entering History: Nikki Giovanni and Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Entering History: Nikki Giovanni and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Five 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Jaime R. Wood

Jaime R. Wood

Portland, Oregon

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Materials and Technology

Mobile Apps

Printouts

Websites

Preparation

 

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

  • An audio copy of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech
  • A hard copy of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech
  • Nikki Giovanni's poem "The Funeral of Martin Luther King, Jr.", which can be found in three texts: Black Feeling, Black Talk, Black Judgement; The Selected Poems of Nikki Giovanni; and The Collected Poetry of Nikki Giovanni
  • General classroom supplies such as pencils (preferably), paper, butcher paper, and markers
  • Overhead projector or LCD projector
  • Computer access
  • Tablet devices for student use of the Word Mover mobile app

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MOBILE APPS

Word Mover

Grades   3 – 12  |  Mobile App  |  Writing Poetry

Word Mover

Word Mover allows children and teens to create “found poetry” by choosing from word banks and existing famous works; additionally, users can add new words to create a piece of poetry by moving/manipulating the text.

 

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PRINTOUTS

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WEBSITES

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PREPARATION

  1. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Speech from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 28 August 1963, also known as the "I Have a Dream" speech. Available versions include the following:
    • HTML Text, from TeachingAmericanHistory.org
    • PDF Text, available in multiple languages, from The Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project at Stanford University
    • Audio recording, from History and Politics Out Loud Website
    • Video of the speech, from Martin Luther King Online. Note that excerpts of the speech are included on videos about the Civil Rights Movement, such Eyes on the Prize, which may also be available in your school media center. The speech is available in its entirety on VHS from Mpi Home Video: Martin Luther King, Jr.—I Have a Dream (1986).
  2. Locate an audio version of Dr. King’s speech (which can also be found in most public libraries), and arrange to have computers or audio equipment available to present the speech. Additionally, make an overhead of the text version of the speech or project it using an LCD projector.
  3. Review and download the Word Mover mobile app for students to use on tablet devices. 
  4. Mark the text version of the speech according to where you want to divide it, giving each student a few lines for which to be responsible.
  5. Make copies of the full text version of the speech, “I Have a Dream” Graphic Organizer, "I Have a Dream" Quiz Checklist, and Reflective Writing Rubric for each student.
  6. Locate Nikki Giovanni’s poem “The Funeral of Martin Luther King, Jr." and then make copies or put it on an overhead.
  7. Make an overhead or handout of the three reflective Writing Prompts from which students can choose.
  8. Place butcher paper on a wall in your classroom so students can write quiz questions and answers on it.
  9. Arrange for students to have computer access for at least one class period.
  10. Make dictionaries available for every student.
  11. Arrange for your class to have an audience at the end of this lesson. The “I Have a Dream” readers’ theater can be performed at an open house, for another class, or in front of the whole school.

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