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Lesson Plan

Exploring The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales using Wikis

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 

Exploring The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales using Wikis

Grades 9 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Three 50-minute blocks
Lesson Author

Kathy Stagner Nichols

Marietta, Georgia

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Materials and Technology

Student Interactives

Printouts

Websites

Preparation

 

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

 

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STUDENT INTERACTIVES

Profile Publisher

Grades   6 – 12  |  Student Interactive  |  Writing & Publishing Prose

Profile Publisher

Students use the Profile Publisher to draft online social networking profiles, yearbook profiles, and newspaper or magazine profiles for themselves, other real or fictional characters.

 

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PRINTOUTS

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WEBSITES

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PREPARATION

  • If your classroom does not have computer access, arrange for class time in the computer lab.
  • Look into your administration’s policies about students publishing on the Internet. Most schools will allow the use of Wikispaces. The collaborative project can be created as a Power Point or other type of presentation is your school does not allow the use of wikis.
  • Register a class wiki using the guidelines established by your county. (This lesson uses Wikispaces.com)
  • Decide if you want students to self-select their groups or if you want to group them. One grouping strategy is to have students write the names of three characters they find especially interesting and to rank these characters in order of most interesting to least interesting. You can use these lists to group students. If you allow students to group themselves, they can submit interest lists as groups. Once groups are formed, appoint one person as technical advisor so that you can train technical advisors while the other group members work on research.

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