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Home Classroom Resources Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Generating Rhymes: Developing Phonemic Awareness

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Grades K – 2
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Two 30-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Sarah Dennis-Shaw

Avon, Massachusetts

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

Learning to recognize rhyming patterns in language is an essential skill for emergent readers. As students manipulate words and sounds to create simple rhymes, they become aware of word and letter patterns that will help them develop decoding skills. In this lesson, students become familiar with 12 rhyming pairs of one-syllable words as they create rhyming lyrics to known songs ("Down by the Bay"), give rhyming words for a given keyword in a poem, and interact with their peers to find rhyming pairs of word cards. Students then demonstrate their knowledge through an individual assessment exercise.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Yopp, H.K., & Yopp, R.H. (2000). Supporting phonemic awareness development in the classroom. The Reading Teacher, 54, 130143.

  • Phonemic awareness, which is the awareness that speech consists of a sequence of sounds, should be a "priority" in early reading instruction.

  • Phonemic awareness instruction should provide students with "linguistic stimulation in the form of storytelling, word games, rhymes, and riddles."

  • Phonemic awareness instruction should be playful and engaging for young students and should be intentional with a specific goal in mind.

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