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Lesson Plan

Investigating Genre: The Case of the Classic Detective Story

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Investigating Genre: The Case of the Classic Detective Story

Grades 9 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Three 50-minute sessions, plus additional time for reading, listening to, or viewing a mystery.
Lesson Author

Scott Filkins

Scott Filkins

Champaign, Illinois

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One

Session Two

Session Three

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • explore the concept of genre and generate a list of conventions for a given genre.
  • critique a list of genre conventions to reveal the social norms behind them.
  • generate a list of genre conventions with awareness of the social norms that inform them.
  • compose a text that responds to a list of genre conventions.
  • reflect on their text and the ways in which it adheres to and deviates from genre conventions for effect.

 

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Session One

  1. After reading, viewing, or listening to a mystery such as The Hound of the Baskervilles, ask students to write down all the ways they knew the story was a mystery.
  2. Have students share some of the features or characteristics they listed. Record the examples on the board, a projector, or a piece of chart paper.
  3. Review with students the concept of genre, making sure that that students have an acceptable grasp—both in terms of its rigidity (guidelines that examples within a genre tend to follow or characteristics that they tend to share) and flexibility (rarely does an example follow all guidelines).
  4. Share with students some background on the subgenre of traditional detective fiction, the genre they have been describing, and the essay "The Mystery Genre" which is part of the Masterpiece Teacher's guide before projecting the “Ten Commandments of Detective Fiction” from Ronald Knox, a British mystery writer active in the 1920s.
  5. Read over the commandments with students, clarifying any unfamiliar words or
    concepts. Ask them to share their responses regarding the validity or applicability of Knox’s rules. Students will inevitably, and rightly, be surprised and offended at the fifth commandment. Use his racist comment to begin a conversation about genre as a construction of a certain period and set of beliefs, not something that is rigid and unchangeable.
  6. Elicit from students ways in which The Hound of the Baskervilles follows and does not follow the guidelines Knox suggested, reinforcing the understanding that genre conventions are not completely rigid.
  7. Then, using Knox’s Genre Commandments as an example, work with students to
    generate an updated list of rules for a “traditional mystery” that suits the realities of the present day. For example, students might think about ways technology and social networking should and should not be allowed to function in a mystery.
  8. Record students’ ideas on the board, a projector, or a piece of chart paper. Ask students to think about this list—including anything they would want to change or add—for the next session.

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Session Two

  1. Begin the session by reviewing the list of genre conventions for a contemporary mystery that the class generated in the previous session. Ask if students have any additional ideas they want to share.
  2. Facilitate a vote to select ten genre conventions that will be the focus for the
    creative writing portion of the lesson.
  3. Have students copy down the ten agreed-upon conventions so they can refer to them as they work. Assure students that they do not need to agree with every characteristic, since the notion of genre is flexible and they will have the opportunity to bend and play with characteristics in their own original writing.
  4. Share with students that they will be getting the opportunity to write their own mystery, using the conventions as a guide.
  5. If you wish, provide students with the list of Genre-Defining Sentences from a recent film adaptation of The Hound of the Baskervilles that they can use as story starters or incorporate throughout their story.
  6. Challenge students to be aware of when they are purposefully using a genre convention (from the list of conventions the class generated, Traditional Detective Fiction “Commandments”, or the Genre-Defining Sentences handout) to make their story function as a mystery—or when they are breaking, altering, or bending a convention to make their story fresh and new.
  7. Consider letting students use the Mystery Cube or provide the Mystery Cube planning sheet to help students as they plan and write their mystery.
  8. Determine with students a date for a future session when students will share their mysteries with a small group of peers. On the determined date, students should bring three copies of their completed mystery.

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Session Three

  1. After students have had time to write their mysteries, select—or have students select—groups of three for sharing their writing.
  2. Distribute the Original Mystery Peer Feedback Guide and explain to students that they will use this handout to record some comments that they will eventually share with their peers. Each student will give copies of his or her mystery to the others in the group. The author will read his or her mystery as peers follow along, stopping occasionally to record comments they wish to offer.
  3. After all three group members have read, students should take turns offering their comments. They should use the space a the bottom of the guide to record ideas they have for their own writing now that they have listened to and commented on two other mysteries.
  4. Ask students to make any revisions or additions they feel are appropriate based on the comments from their peers.
  5. Have students write a reflective piece that highlights the intentions behind their
    mystery’s adherence to and deviation from the expectations for the genre.

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EXTENSIONS

  • After students write and share their updated mysteries, have students view the new interpretation of Sherlock Holmes set in modern London and utilizing tools such as the Internet and cell phones (PBS Masterpiece, fall 2010).
  • After investigating the subgenre of classic detective fiction, allow students to choose another subgenre within mystery—or another genre entirely—to explore.
  • Students can record their mysteries, add music and sound effects, and publish them as podcasts on a school website.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Focusing more on students’ reflective writing that the mystery itself, look for evidence of students’ blind adherence to genre standards or capricious or ineffective deviation from them and provide appropriate corrective feedback on their drafts. Also look for evidence of thoughtful use of the conventions to make the story identifiable as and function as a mystery and justifiable deviations that enhance the effectiveness of their
    story.

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