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Lesson Plan

Making Personal and Cultural Connections Using A Girl Named Disaster

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Making Personal and Cultural Connections Using A Girl Named Disaster

Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 60-minute sessions, plus time for students to read the book and respond in their logs
Lesson Author

Kathleen Benson Quinn

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

This lesson is intended to help students experience both “efferent” (reading for information) and “aesthetic” (reading as a personal, emotional experience) responses to the story A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer. Students work as a whole class and with partners to explore the main character Nhamo as she struggles to survive in her extended family and on her many travels alone. Students can make geographic, economic, cultural, religious, ethnic, and personal connections. Suggestions are given for a wide array of interactions and activities to help your students develop a rich transaction with this text.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

  • Interactive Stapleless Book: Students can use this feature to create a short story that describes something that happened in their personal lives.

  • Interactive Venn Diagram: Students can use features to compare and contrast story elements from A Girl Named Disaster to events in their own lives.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Miller, H.M. (2000). Teaching and learning about cultural diversity: A dose of empathy. The Reading Teacher, 54(4), 380–381.

  • Literature can be used to help students make personal and cultural connections.

  • Literature can be used to help students dispel ignorance (efferent stance).

  • Literature can be used to help students become personally engaged with a character (aesthetic stance).

 

 

Gardner, H. (2000). Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. NY: Basic Books.

 

Ogle, D. (1986). K-W-L: A teaching model that develops active reading of expository text. The Reading Teacher, 39, 564-571.

K-W-L: A teaching model that develops active reading of expository text

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