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Lesson Plan

Peer Edit With Perfection: Effective Strategies

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Peer Edit With Perfection: Effective Strategies

Grades 3 – 5
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Three 45-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Sarah Dennis-Shaw

Avon, Massachusetts

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

Do students' eyes glaze over when they try to edit their own writing? Give them a fresh perspective with peer editing. Students are introduced to a three-step strategy for peer editing, providing (1) compliments, (2) suggestions, and (3) corrections in response to a sample of student writing. They practice these steps in a small-group session and share the results with the class. Then they move to individual editing practice guided by a PowerPoint tutorial and accompanying worksheet. This series of practice activities prepares students to engage in constructive peer editing of classmates’ written work on a regular basis.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Peterson, S. (Ed.). (2003). Untangling some knots in K–8 writing instruction. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

  • Writing and revising in the classroom often involves peer discussion, whether in a one-to-one or group setting.

  • Editing is an arduous and unwelcome task for many students; peer editing can improve students' interest in and enthusiasm for the revision stage of the writing process.

 

Tompkins, G.E. (2003). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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