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Lesson Plan

Persuade Me in Five Slides! Creating Persuasive Digital Stories

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Persuade Me in Five Slides!  Creating Persuasive Digital Stories

Grades 6 – 12
Estimated Time Four 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Kathy Wickline

Kathy Wickline

Tolono, Illinois

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session 1

Session 2

Session 3

Session 4

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • analyze their persuasive writing.
  • concisely summarize their writing.
  • create presentations that visually reflect their writing to others.

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Session 1

  1. Divide the students into pairs and invite them to pair-share their persuasive writing assignments. Tell students to share the following with their partner:

    • Their topic and their stance on the topic.
    • The three most persuasive reasons for their opinion.
    • Conclusion including call to action.
  2. Once students have completed sharing with their partner, project the images you have saved from Fifty Creative & Effective Advertising Examples and/or 10 Creative Safe Driving Awareness Ads. Discuss with the students how combining an image with an opinion strengthensfiv an argument and solicit other examples they have seen of effective advertising.
  3. Invite students to visualize their arguments and consider how they could make their own persuasive writing stronger by combining their points with images. Explain to the class that they will have this opportunity as they will create a five-slide presentation that illustrates their persuasive writing assignment in a concise manner.
  4. Hand out the Five-Slide Presentation Rubric and cover this rubric thoroughly so that students will understand what is expected of their presentation. Stress the following points:

    • Because of the time limit of two minutes and thirty seconds, concise wording is extremely important.
    • Because images will add to the argument, selection of thought-provoking images is crucial.
    • Because music evokes emotions, selecting appropriate background music is important, too.
    • Because students will listen to each otherís presentations, their recordings need to be clear and read with emotion.
  5. Hand out the Five-Slide Presentation Planner printout and together read the instructions. As students work, circulate through the room, checking for concise word choice and grammar.
  6. Assign students to complete the printout before the next session.

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Session 2

  1. Divide students into pairs to peer edit what each has written. Ask the students to consider the following:†

    • Be sure that the authorsís stance on the issue is readily identified.
    • Check that the last slide explains what action needs to be taken.
    • Identify two examples of concise word choice in their partnerís writing.
    • Suggest two places where their partner could improve their word choice.
    • Read the sentences out loud to each other to check on time.
    • Check that all sentences are grammatically correct.
  2. After students have completed peer editing, allow time for students to make revisions.
  3. Model for students to how to find five images for the presentation using the Image Websites. Demonstrate where students should save their images. Also consider giving students the option of taking photos outside of the classroom and help them move the photos into the chosen software.
  4. As students work, question them about the choices of their images. Ask what effect the students think the images will evoke and how the selected images support their arguments.
  5. Model for students the method you have chosen for students to create their presentations. Include adding their photos and recordings to their presentations. Also, demonstrate how to change the volume of the background music.
  6. Allow time for students to work on their projects. As students work, assist those who have trouble with technology.
  7. At the end of the session, model for students how to save their presentations so they can continue working in the next session.

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Session 3

  1. Provide students more time finish their presentations.
  2. As students finish their presentations, pair them up to evaluate each other presentations using the Five-Slide Presentation Rubric.† After evaluating each otherís presentation, allow students additional time to make revisions.
  3. After students have revised their presentations, model for them how to complete the final save of their projects.† If they used Brainshark, students can e-mail links of their finished project that can be posted to a class website or wiki. Microsoft Photo Story presentations can be e-mailed, saved to the schoolís network or saved to a flashstick so that presentations can be easily shown during the next session.

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Session 4

  1. Project each studentís presentation and allow time after each presentation for comments and questions.
  2. When all presentations have been shared, discuss the presentations with the students. Consider using some of the following questions:

    • What made these presentations interesting?
    • Which presentations persuaded you? Why were they more effective?
    • In what type of situations outside of the classroom would showing a persuasive presentation help you persuade others? Why would this be an effective method for dealing with particular issues or problems?
    • How could this project have been improved?
    • What did you learn from making these presentations?

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EXTENSIONS

  • Share the presentations with other classes in the school.
  • Try making other five-slide presentations for other types of writing.
  • This lesson could also be done with the iPad app SonicPics (not a free app).

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

Possible student assessment include the following:

  • Observe student participation in the discussion about the project during the last session.
  • Use the Five-Slide Presentation Rubric to assess studentsí finished products.
  • Ask students to explain the relationship between the images and music they choose for their arguments.
  • Review studentsí completed Five-Slide Presentation Planner printouts.

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