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Lesson Plan

Prove It!: A Citation Scavenger Hunt

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Prove It!: A Citation Scavenger Hunt

Grades 6 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Minilesson
Estimated Time One 50-minute session
Lesson Author

Patrick Striegel

Patrick Striegel

Tolono, Illinois

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • evaluate citations and the importance of their use.
  • demonstrate the ability to find citations that support specific claims in a fiction text.
  • identify the purposes of citations.

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Session One

  1. Begin the session with a class discussion about citations and importance of usage.  Ask the students : "What is the purpose of a citation?" (to avoid plagiarism, to assign proper authority to a statement) and "When is the use of a citation appropriate?"
  2. Explain to the class that an early step in the citation process is finding support for a specific claim.  Display to the class three or more of the claims below and ask the students why they need support and where they might find it.
    • China is the largest nation in the world.
    • A McDonald’s Big Mac® has 550 calories.
    • Moose Flanagan and his family move to Alcatraz Island. (Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko)
    • Rifka has to overcome the hatred of Russian soldiers, as well as, typhus and ringworm. (Letters from Rifka by Karen Hesse)
    • Mae Tuck, her husband, and her two sons have looked exactly the same for the last 87 years. (Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt)
  3. Inform the class that you are challenging them to a citation competition.
  4. Distribute and explain the Citation Hunt Catching Fire Example Printout and answer any questions that students may have.  Next, give each student a copy of the Citation Hunt Printout that will be used for the text that they read.
  5. If needed, complete the first statement together. Have students work in pairs or as an individual to complete the challenge.
  6. Circulate around the classroom making sure that students are recording appropriate citations and page numbers.  Help students as needed.
  7. When all students have completed the activity, come together as a group to share their findings.  Have students share their favorite piece of evidence to their classmates.  Supporting excerpts from the book can be written on the board, an overhead, or chart paper.
  8. Have the students take out a piece of notebook paper or use the back of the Citation Hunt Printout to reflect on the following questions that are displayed on the board, overhead, or chart paper.
    • Why are citations important?
    • How did you find support for the claims?
    • Is it wrong to not cite sources?  Why or Why not?
    • How would you feel if your ideas or work were used without giving you credit?
  9. Allow the students time to share their reflections with the class.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Before or after this activity, use the Why We Cite Sources in Academic Papers printout as a discussion guide with the class.  Focus on the three main reasons why citations are needed in academic writing during the discussion.  This extension would be appropriate before the research process begins.
  • Create a citation bookmark that can be used while reading to keep track of excerpts that support specific claims.  Please see Genre Study: A Collaborative Approach to see a similar use of bookmarks within a lesson and a sample bookmark.
  • Have students use Google Books to look up a favorite or popular quotation from a text.  Once their excerpt is found have students properly cite the source using the Citation Machine.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Use the completed Citation Hunt Printout to check for correct support of the specific claims from the text.
  • During the class discussion, evaluate students for increased knowledge of citations and when and why they are used during academic writing.

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