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Lesson Plan

And the Question Is... Writing Good Survey Questions

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Grades 9 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 60-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Patricia Alejandra Lastiri

Patricia Alejandra Lastiri

Villanova d'Asti, Asti

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

The ability to ask questions is critical to learning, and well-framed questions elicit better answers that further understanding and dialogue. However, learning to ask the right questions is a difficult skill to develop. In this lesson, students learn how to create effective questions by examining survey questions and creating their own survey on reading habits.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Chuska, K.R. (1995). Improving classroom questions: A teacher's guide to increasing student motivation, participation, and higher-level thinking. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.

  • Good questions are important for several reasons, including for two-way communication between a teacher and student or between students themselves.

  • Questions help build students' understanding and promote high-level thinking. By asking questions, students become more aware of their learning processes.

 

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