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Lesson Plan

Sentence Quest: Using Parts of Speech to Write Descriptive Sentences

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Sentence Quest: Using Parts of Speech to Write Descriptive Sentences

Grades K – 2
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Five 40-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Renee Goularte

Renee Goularte

Magalia, California

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Materials and Technology

Websites

Preparation

 

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

  • General classroom supplies (markers, index cards, pencils, blank paper, adding machine tape, chart paper)

  • Kites Sail High: A Book About Verbs by Ruth Heller (Paper Star (Penguin/Putnam), 1999)

  • Merry-Go-Round: A Book About Nouns by Ruth Heller (Bt Books, 1998)

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WEBSITES

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PREPARATION

  • Gather all needed materials.

  • Cut adding machine tape into lengths of approximately five feet each. Cut at least two lengths for each group of four students. Keep the roll on hand.

  • For Session Three, students will need to be divided into three heterogeneous groups, with reading ability balanced among the groups.

  • For Session Four, students will need to be divided into heterogeneous groups of four. Try to balance abilities across groups so that reading strengths and needs are distributed among the groups. If it is a mixed-age class, groups should be mixed-age.

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