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Lesson Plan

Teaching Student Annotation: Constructing Meaning Through Connections

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 

Teaching Student Annotation: Constructing Meaning Through Connections

Grades 9 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Matthew D. Brown

Matthew D. Brown

Canyon Country, California

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Materials and Technology

Student Interactives

Printouts

Preparation

 

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

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STUDENT INTERACTIVES

ReadWriteThink Webbing Tool

Grades   3 – 12  |  Student Interactive  |  Organizing & Summarizing

ReadWriteThink Webbing Tool

The Webbing Tool provides a free-form graphic organizer for activities that ask students to pursue hypertextual thinking and writing.

 

Literary Graffiti

Grades   9 – 12  |  Student Interactive  |  Organizing & Summarizing

Literary Graffiti

Literary Graffiti, a high school version of the Doodle Splash student interactive, also aims to teach students to visualize what they are reading to help them develop as readers.

 

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PRINTOUTS

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PREPARATION

  1. Find sample annotated texts to share with your students. Shakespeare's plays work well since many of his texts are annotated.  Red Reader editions published by Discovery Teacher have great user-friendly annotations geared toward young adult readers.  Look for selections that are engaging—ones that offer more than vocabulary definitions and give a variety of annotations beyond explanation and analysis.
  2. Alternatively, search Google Books for any text with annotations.  A search for Romeo and Juliet, for example, will bring up numerous versions that can be viewed directly online.
  3. While much of the work will be done by students, it is useful to take some time to think about the role of annotations in a text.  You will have students identify the functions of annotations, but it is always helpful if you have your own list of uses of annotations so that you can help guide students in this area of instruction if necessary.
  4. Make copies of all necessary handouts.
  5. Arrange for students to have access to Internet-connected computers if they will be doing their annotations in an online interactive.
  6. Test the Literary Graffiti and Webbing Tool interactives on your computers to familiarize yourself with the tools and ensure that you have the Flash plug-in installed. You can download the plug-in from the technical support page.

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