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Home õ Classroom Resources õ Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan

What Did George Post Today? Learning About People of the American Revolution Through Facebook

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What Did George Post Today?  Learning About People of the American Revolution Through Facebook

Grades 6 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Nine 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Kathy Wickline

Kathy Wickline

Tolono, Illinois

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One

Sessions Two and Three

Sessions Four and Five

Sessions Six and Seven

Sessions Eight and Nine

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • identify people of the American Revolution time period.
  • develop research skills using both print and online resources with the purpose of teaching the class what they have learned.
  • explain how these people were important to the American Revolution.
  • communicate their findings by using their Facebook-like presentation to prompt them.

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Session One

  1. Put on the board the words ďAmerican RevolutionĒ and ask the students to brainstorm in small groups what images come to mind when they think about this era of American history.
  2. Have the students then share with the class their lists of ideas.† As students are sharing their ideas, ask what people are a part of these images.†
    • For example, students might mention the Declaration of Independence, so ask students who was involved in the writing of this document.† Probably students will know the well-known names of Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, but mention some of the lesser-known people such as Button Gwinnett and Caesar Rodney as well.
    • Likewise, students might know some of the battles of the American Revolution, so ask students who were the leaders. Again the students will probably know George Washington, so to engage the students mention that women such as Molly Pitcher and Margaret Corbin also helped on the battlefields.
  3. Although the students may only know a few of the main people of the American Revolution, explain that several Americans played significant roles in this time period, and for background information to the American Revolution, each student will research one of these individuals to create a Facebook-like PowerPoint to share with the class.
  4. Show the sample PowerPoint for Captain John Smith of the colonial period.† Discuss with the students who is the audience for a Facebook page and how that affects the writing style.† Sample questions are below:
    • Who typically reads oneís Facebook page?
    • What type of information do people share on Facebook?
    • If you were telling your friends about an incident in the hallway at school, would you use the same language if you were telling your principal about the same incident?
  5. Hand out the Rubric and assess the John Smith Facebook-like PowerPoint Example using the Rubric.† As the rubic designates, explain to the students that when they present, they will add more facts to each posting, so that their classmates can more fully understand the importance of each person to the American Revolution.† Model for students using the Facebook-like PowerPoint Example how to add more information to a couple of the postings. Also, model for the students how to use the picture slide at the end of their PowerPoint in their presentation.† When a student discusses a posting or detail of the profile that is depicted on the last slide of photos, the student clicks on the word "Photos" at the top of the slide to advance to the last slide.† To return to the postings or profile, the student clicks "Wall" or "Info."
  6. Hand out or project the printout People of the American Revolution.† Have students select who they would like to research so research can begin in the next session.† Record who is researching each person for classmates.

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Sessions Two and Three

  1. Hand out the Note-Taking Sheet.† Using the John Smith PowerPoint, explain where each category is used in the PowerPoint. Remind the students that they are looking in particular at the role these people play in the American Revolution, so the majority of their events should take place during that time period.
  2. Using either the classroom library or school library, have each student check out a biography on his/her person.
  3. Using their print resources, have students complete as much as possible of the Note-Taking Sheet.† Monitor the students as they work, noting time on task, as that is part of the rubric.† Also, check the Note-Taking Sheets for accuracy and for detail so that students will be able to add information to their presentations.† Remind students that in the next two sessions they will use online sources, so they do not have to find everything in the biographies.

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Sessions Four and Five

  1. Have the students continue to research using the websites as well as their books.
  2. Again monitor the students as they research, noting time on task.† Check for any inaccuracies on their Note-Taking Sheets. Check that students have sufficient information in sections so that they can add information to their presentations.
  3. If the students have not completed their Note-Taking Sheets in the last four sessions, assign that as homework because the next three sessions will be for assembling their presentations.

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Sessions Six and Seven

  1. Show the students the Microsoft PowerPoint of John Smith again.† Discuss how the postings are ordered.† Examine what images are used for profile and friends as well as the photo album.† Remind them to find images for their last slide, the photo slide, that they can use during their presentations to add details to the postings.
  2. Model for the students how to find images on the web and where you want students to save their images on the computers.† Instruct students to find their images.
  3. Using what method you decided upon in the preparation steps, provide each student with the Facebook-like Template.† Model for the student how to insert their images, how to add postings, how to move friendsí comments, and how to add more postings and friendsí comment boxes.† Revisit your earlier discussion of writing style and discuss the audience for a Facebook page is the personís family and friends, so that the style is more informal. Encourage students to be creative in their postings.
  4. Allow time for the students to work on their presentations, noting time on task for future reference when assessing their work.
  5. During session seven, have students practice their presentations.† Remind the students to add information and use the photo slide where appropriate in their presentations. Have students use the Peer Feedback printout for students to review each otherís presentations. As students practice, monitor that they are completing this form.

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Sessions Eight and Nine

  1. As each student presents, have the other students complete the What Did I Learn? forms.† They will complete one form for every two presenters (two evaluations per sheet).
  2. Collect the forms at the end of the sessionand review them, checking for accuracy of information.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Establish a class wiki and post the PowerPoint presentations to the wiki so that the school community can see the final creations.
  • If computers are not available to the students, faux Facebook pages could be made on large sheets of paper and students could use these to present.† They could be displayed in the school hallways, so that entire school community can view the studentsí work.
  • To have students explore more about different styles of writing, have the students use their research notes to write formal essays on their people and discuss how this type of writing varies from social media.
  • Using their What Did I Learn? form, have students debate who they think made the most important contributions to this time period.
  • Have each student create a Bio Cube to be displayed in the classroom so as the class continues to learn about the American Revolution, visual reminders of these important people will exist.
  • Get creative and repeat this activity with different periods of history!

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Review each studentís completed Note-Taking Sheet.
  • During the class periods, observe and note the studentsí time on task as this is one of the categories on the Rubric.
  • Using the Rubric, evaluate each studentís completed PowerPoint presentation.
  • Review the completed What Did I Learn? forms

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