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Lesson Plan

What’s My Subject? A Subject-Verb Agreement Minilesson

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Grades 9 – 12
Lesson Plan Type Minilesson
Estimated Time 50 minutes
Lesson Author

Patricia Alejandra Lastiri

Patricia Alejandra Lastiri

Villanova d'Asti, Asti

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

Reviewing subject–verb agreement doesn’t have to be tedious. In this minilesson, high school students explore subject-verb agreement using real-life examples from newspapers and song lyrics. In addition to reviewing and identifying both correct and incorrect subject-verb agreement, students look at when it may be appropriate to use ungrammatical language and talk about the difference between formal and informal language. They then make up quizzes to share with their peers. The emphasis of the lesson is on asking students to discover how this important grammatical rule is used (or deliberately ignored) in a variety of settings.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Haussamen, Brock, et al. 2003. Grammar Alive! A Guide for Teachers. Urbana, IL: NCTE.

  • We all learn grammar naturally as we acquire language skills. In teaching grammar, it is best to assume you are pointing out things that students already know inherently but not explicitly.

  • Teachers need to show students that they can discover grammar wherever they find language.

  • One key component of teaching real-world grammar is to show students the different grammatical structures that are used in formal versus informal settings, drawing attention in particular to the differences inherent in writing and speaking.

Read more about this resource

 

Celce-Murcia, M., & Larsen-Freeman, D. (1999). The copula and subject–verb agreement. In The grammar book: An ESL/EFL teacher's course, (2nd ed., pp. 53-78). Boston: Heinle & Heinle.

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