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Home Classroom Resources Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Writing Poetry with Rebus and Rhyme

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Writing Poetry with Rebus and Rhyme

Grades K – 2
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Four 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Devon Hamner

Devon Hamner

Grand Island, Nebraska

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Student Objectives

Session One: Discovering Rebus Writing

Sessions Two and Three: Exploring Rebus and Rhyme

Session Four: Time to Share

Extensions

Student Assessment/Reflections

 

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • explore the connections between words and images using rebus books.
  • compose original rebus poems, based on a model.
  • define and explore rhyme by identifying rhyming words.
  • reflect on their writing process.

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Session One: Discovering Rebus Writing

  1. Introduce the students to a variety of books using rebus writing. Help them discover how pictures can take the place of words in a variety of books by showing them several examples.
  2. Read the book I Love You: A Rebus Poem by Jean Marzollo to your students.
    • As you introduce this book and read it aloud to your students, encourage them to just enjoy the rhythm and rhyme of the poem on the first reading.
    • On repeated readings, help students join you in reading the rebus pictures as a shared reading experience.
    • Have your students identify the rhyming words of the poem.
    • Help students identify the pattern/structure of the book:

      Every _______ loves a ________ (rhyming word),
      Every _______ loves a ________ (rhyming word),
      Every _______ loves a ________ (rhyming word),
      And I love you!

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Sessions Two and Three: Exploring Rebus and Rhyme

  1. Revisit the book I Love You: A Rebus Poem by Jean Marzollo. Tell students that they are going to get the opportunity to write their own poem modeled on this book.
  2. Form students into small groups of three and help them brainstorm some rhyming words that could fit into the poem.
  3. For kindergarten and first grade students, it is helpful to use Rhyming Picture Cards or another of the rhyming aids listed in the Resources section. Help students generate sets of three rhyming words.
  4. Once your rhyming words are chosen, help the students work together to complete the second part of the pattern: For example, if the group has chosen "skate, plate, gate," they might complete the pattern with: Every skater loves a skate, Every eater loves a plate, Every fence loves a gate, and I love you!
  5. Then help the students choose what part of the rhyme each will illustrate. Hand out the poem frame, drawing materials, and let them complete their drawings.
  6. Continue with the other groups of three until each group has completed their verses of the poem. (This process could also be done with older students acting as buddies to the younger students by helping them choose their rhymes and complete the pattern of the poem.)
  7. Students waiting their turn to compose can use the Reggie the Rhyming Rhino site from Scholastic to practice rhyming.
  8. Put the parts of the poem together and gather the students to hear and celebrate their completed rebus poem.
  9. Provide time for students to reflect on what they learned about rebus writing and the rhythm and rhyme of their poem.

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Session Four: Time to Share

  1. Share your poem with a selected audience:
    • Have a poetry reading and invite parents or other classes to come and celebrate your rebus poem.
    • Make copies of the poem for each student to take home as a special gift or Valentine for his/her family.
    • Display your poem on a hallway bulletin board and invite other classes to view it.
    • Include a poetry reading as part of Grandparents Day activities.
    • Invite Business and Education Partners for a poetry reading and give them a copy of the poem to display at their work site.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Ask students to create a book cover or dust jacket for the class book using the Book Cover Creator. The tool does not include an option to save the work, so be sure that students do enough planning that they will be able to complete their covers in one session.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • During your class discussion after sharing the finished poem, encourage students to reflect on the process of writing the poem. Help them to share what they have learned. Encourage them to reflect on the process of rebus writing, choosing rhymes, completing the pattern of the poem, and sharing their poem with an audience.
  • Encourage students to assess their own participation in the writing process using the following scale:

    Star: Yes! I tried my best, and I did great!
    Happy Face: I did a good job most of the time.
    OK: I could have tried harder, but I'll do better next time.


    Students can rate themselves on each of the following:
    • I shared my ideas in my group.
    • I was a good listener when others shared their ideas.
    • I did my best when I made my pictures for the poem.

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