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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Parent & Afterschool Resources

ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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Activity

Acting Out with Mother Goose

 

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Acting Out with Mother Goose

Grades K – 2
Activity Time One to two hours
Activity Author

Lisa Storm Fink

Lisa Storm Fink

Urbana, Illinois

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

  • Copies of Mother Goose stories, print or online
  • Paper and general art supplies (pencils, pens, markers)
  • Craft supplies if costumes or props are desired (paper plates, paper sacks, yarn, colored file folder stickers [for eyes], markers, crayons, glitter, colored feathers, straws, colored chalk, paint, glue, construction paper, felt, tissue paper, and crepe paper)
  • I'm a Reading Star Chart

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Here's What To Do

  1. Gather a selection of Mother Goose stories.
  2. Select several to read aloud or with a child, taking turns, reading in unison, etc.
  3. As you are reading together, talk about the characters involved, where the story takes place, and what is happening. Also share with the child that after the story, you will work together to act out the story.
  4. After reading several Mother Goose stories and marking it on an I'm a Reading Star Chart, ask the child if there is one of the stories they would like to act out.
  5. Review the characters involved, where the story takes place, and what is happening. Talk about the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
  6. Working together, decide how to act out the story.
    • Who will play each part? Will you have to act as more than one character?
    • Do you want to ask friends for help?
    • Should you make costumes or masks? What about making a puppet?
    • Would you like to make a set to show where the story takes place?
  7. Share with the child that not each and every part and detail of the story needs to be part of the act. They should choose the major sections to act out.
  8. Next, talk about if you need a script or if you will memorize what you are going to say. If you are going to write a script, visit PBS ZOOM Playhouse "Jack and The Beanstalk" to see examples.
  9. If using a script, highlight the part each person is going to read. Use a different color highlighter for each person. Also, mark the actions taking place: Is someone walking? Are there lines said in unison?
  10. Have a supply of art materials ready to create masks, puppets, or costumes.
  11. Practice your retelling and acting out of the story a few times.
  12. Invite an audience to come see the act. This can include family, friends, and neighbors.
  13. Have fun acting out your Mother Goose story!

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More Ideas To Try

  • Create invitations or hang up signs announcing the performance!
  • Listen to some Mother Goose stories as they are read aloud. You can also read along with them.
  • Play with the rhyming words found in the Mother Goose stories.
  • Choose other stories to act out like fairy tales, your favorite picture book, etc.
  • After writing a story together, act it out as well!

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Glossary

Script

 

The written part of a comic book or graphic novel, play, movie, or television show, including dialogue.

Role play

 

An activity in which children or teens pretend to be a character, object, or other person in a certain situation. Sometimes the roles are clearly defined and children act out an agreed upon script. At other times, the play can be freer, with more improvisation. Role play allows learners to experiment with language and ideas in a low-risk environment.

Character

 

A person, animal, or object represented in a story or play.

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