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Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Activity

Fairy Tales and You

 

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Fairy Tales and You

Grades 3 – 5
Activity Time 6090 minutes
Activity Author

Lisa Storm Fink

Lisa Storm Fink

Urbana, Illinois

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

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Here's What To Do

  1. Begin by asking the children to share the names of various fairy tales that they know. Remind them to think of books, television programs, and movies with which they are familiar. If they need some ideas, look at this list of fairy tales together.
  2. Ask the children to describe these fairy tales. What do they have in common? What do they notice in all fairy tales? If desired, refer to the Common Fairy Tale Elements handout or look through fairy-tale books.
  3. Explain to the children that they will be writing their own fairy tales. They can work alone, with partners, or with an adult. They will choose events from their own lives or lives of someone they know, and create fairy tales based on the situations.
  4. Begin by brainstorming what their fairy tales could be about. If the children need some ideas, share with them the list of Common Fairy Tale Situations.
  5. In their fairy tales, children will need to develop characters, the plot (including beginning, middle, and end), and the setting. Children can handwrite their stories or use a word processor.
  6. Read the fairy tales out loud to make sure they make sense. Does the story flow logically? Is there a beginning, middle, and end? Is anything missing from the story? Make any needed changes.
  7. After reading, discuss if their new tales sound similar to any fairy tales they have read. How are their tales like other fairy tales? How are they different?
  8. When the fairy tales are complete, have children illustrate them.
  9. Take time to share the fairy tale with others!

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More Ideas To Try

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Glossary

Plot

 

The structure of the action of a story; what happens in the story.

Setting

 

The time and place where the actions of a story happen.

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