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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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Activity

Fantastically Fun Word Families

 

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Fantastically Fun Word Families

Grades K – 2
Activity Time 30-40 minutes
Activity Author

Amy Mascott

Amy Mascott

DC Metro, Maryland

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

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Here's What To Do

  1. Install the Word Mover app on the tablet device that the child will use for this activity.
  2. Create a New User.  Choose a User Name to begin.  Click ? near the “Show User Manager” if you have questions about creating a New User, or for further support throughout the use of the app.
  3. Click on “create NEW found poetry," followed by  “My Own Words."
  4. Click “Add a Word” and type any anchor word you would like from a word family on which you would like to focus.  Consider: cat, sit, top, or bet.
  5. Talk about the word and its sounds, “stretching” it out to emphasize the beginning, middle, and ending sound, like c-a-t.   Explain that you are going to work together to create a fantastic “family” for this word by adding words that rhyme, or share the same sound.  For example, when using “cat” you can add the words bat, sat, rat, fat, mat, vat, wat, pat, lat, dat, zat, etc.  Consider saving your Fantastically Fun Word Family List for future use.
  6. When you have created a full list of about 5-10 words, go back and re-read each word, pointing to it as you read.  Encourage the child to read with you or to “echo read” (read the word immediately after you read it, much like an echo).
  7. Sort the words by organizing them into groups! Some of the words may draw giggles from the child because the words are not “real” words; they may be words he or she is not familiar with hearing because they are nonsense words.  Use this opportunity to explain that some of the words in the Fantastically Fun Word Family are not “real” words; they are nonsense words.  Model the sorting of real and nonsense words for the child by moving one real word to the left side of the screen and moving a nonsense word to the right side of the screen.   Support the child as he or she sorts the list.
  8. Talk about how you can also organize a Fantastically Fun Word Family by putting the words in “ABC” or alphabetical order by looking only at the first letter of each word.   Move all of the words to the bottom of the screen and place the word that would come first in alphabetical order to the top left of the screen.  Continue alphabetizing the list until all the words are in place.  Read the list together when finished.
  9. Use the words that you have created in the Fantastically Fun Word Family word bank to do some creative writing by creating a poem or story.  Model your own short poem for the child, adding words as necessary. Read the completed poem together, perhaps encouraging the child to read the word family words along with you.
  10. Decide on an interesting background.  Click on “Backgrounds” on the right side of the screen and explore the choices.
  11. Create a title for the work.  Type the title into the box at the top of the screen where it says “Untitled Work”.
  12. Save or share your Fantastically Fun Word Family poem or story for the future, print it out, or share it with friends and family.  Hanging the final draft in a place where the child can see it and read it regularly will help to reinforce these important words.

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More Ideas To Try

  • Instead of generating a word family list together, use “found” words from around a room or family names and typing them into a word bank.
  • Use an already-created word bank and find any rhyming words.
  • Have the child put each word onto an index card so that the Fabulously Fun Word Family sorting and alphabetizing can be done anywhere, any time.
  • Encourage the child to read his or her poem to a friend or family member.
  • Consider having the child create a book or compilation of all of his or her Fantastically Fun Word Family work.

 

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Glossary

Emerging Readers

 

A term used to describe children who have some early literacy skills but are not yet fluent readers.

Phonemic Awareness

 

Knowing that spoken words are made up of individual sounds (also called phonemes). This knowledge is not something children need to learn how to speak and understand a language, but it is important for learning how to read.

Rhyme

 

Identical or very similar sounds in words (for example, cat and hat or book and look).

Word Families

 

Also known as phonograms, word families are groups of words that have a common pattern. For example, the -an word family contains the words fan, pan, ran, plan, man, and so on.

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