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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Parent & Afterschool Resources

ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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Activity

Let's Go On A Poetry Walk!

 

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Let's Go On A Poetry Walk!

Grades K – 8
Activity Time 45 minutes to 1 hour
Activity Author

Patrick Striegel

Patrick Striegel

Tolono, Illinois

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Saving Your Work With RWT Interactive Tools

Glossary

 

What You Need

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Here's What To Do

Adjust your level of involvement depending on the child’s age and personality. A younger child might want more guidance while a teen is likely to prefer more independence.

  1. Introduce the poetry walk project. Explain that the poem can be about any aspect of nature they want to explore. Have the child tell you about the last time they were outside. What was it like? The temperature? The sights, sounds, smells, and textures?
  2. Choose one or two nature poems or Recommended Nature Books for Children to read to the child. Lead a discussion asking leading questions:
    • What did you picture in your mind?
    • What are some of the things that you can describe?
  3. Before heading out on the nature walk, handout and explain the Five Sense Observation Handout. The children should use this sheet to record their observations while on the walk and can use the back of the handout to draw pictures of what they are observing.
  4. Take children on a poetry walk around the neighborhood or community. Allow the children to set the pace of the walk to allow them to record their observations. They can also collect objects to take back with them such as rocks, pebbles, leaves, and small branches (no living things).
  5. Explain the different formats of poetry. Or you can let the child try the interactives or look at the Poetry Example Sheet to see how each works. Allow the child to select one format for their first poem.
  6. Guide the children to write ability-appropriate poetry using their observations from the poetry walk.
  7. When the poem is complete, have the child read it aloud. Does the poet like the way it sounds? Do you – the audience – have any suggestions?
  8. Proudly display the child's work on a bulletin board, display case, or refrigerator.

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More Ideas To Try

  • Take it back outside! Grab some sidewalk chalk and let the child write the finished poem on the sidewalk or driveway.
  • Get out the markers and crayons!  Let the child create original illustrations that represent their poetry.
  • Suggest that older children record their completed poems as a podcast. Use our activity How to Record Podcasts to guide you through the process.
  • Share your work.  Create a greeting card with your poetry and give it to a friend or loved one.

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Saving Your Work With RWT Interactive Tools

Once you’ve finished your poem, use the saving capability within the interactive tool to save your file.

  1. On the final screen of the interactive, click Save Final.
  2. Name your file something that is descriptive of your poem, and click Save.
  3. Select a place on your computer or external drive to save the file, and click Save.
  4. For more information about the saving capability, see our RWT ReView: Saving Work With the Student Interactives.

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Glossary

Observe

 

When children and teens observe, they may be following a formal process with a checklist of things to look for, or they may be exploring such a new experience that they can ask questions only after observing. Either way, observing should involve children and teens in the process of watching something closely, asking questions, and discussing what they have seen.

Theme

 

A major idea, message, or lesson that is told in a story or conveyed in a piece of art. A theme may be stated directly or not, but clues to the theme can usually be found when the ideas or messages are repeated.

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