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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Parent & Afterschool Resources

ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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Activity

Postcards from the Trail

 

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Postcards from the Trail

Grades 3 – 5
Activity Time 30-60 minutes per postcard
Activity Author

Kathy Wickline

Kathy Wickline

Tolono, Illinois

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

Activity Description

Why This Is Helpful

 

Activity Description

After enjoying an online book about about traveling west on a wagon train, children create postcards from the point of view of the main character(s) for one or more stops on the journey. When children think what it would be like to be one of the characters in a story, they learn about new places, experiences, and situations.

Whether their travel is real or imagined, children can help children use the online Postcard Creator to combine words and images to share experiences from faraway places.

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Why This Is Helpful

In the age of texting and tweeting, writing postcards seems like a lost art.  But creating a description of a place you’ve visited for an audience back home can be a fun activity for children.  For this activity, children read a book about the wild west and create postcards from the point of view of the main character.  As children pretend to be one of the main characters, they can take on the voice and experience of someone else. When writing from the point of view of a character, the child must analyze the character to understand his/her personality traits and actions.  They must write about what happens in the plot in a concise manner because of the limiting size of a postcard.

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