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Activity

School Day Extension

 

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School Day Extension

Grades K – 6
Activity Time 20-45 minutes
Activity Author

Amy Mascott

Amy Mascott

DC Metro, Maryland

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

 

What You Need

  • Word Mover mobile app for tablet devices
  • Worksheet, handout, printout, or book from the child's school day

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Here's What To Do

  1. Install the Word Mover app on the tablet device that the child will use for this activity.
  2. Create a New User.  Choose a User Name to begin.  Click ? near the “Show User Manager” if you have questions about creating a New User, or for further support throughout the use of the app.
  3. Click on “create NEW found poetry," followed by  “My Own Words."
  4. Have the child enter important words or key terms into his/her blank "poem" from the classroom material(s) he or she brought home from school (the placement of the words does not matter; that will be addressed later).  Consider using word searches, crossword puzzles, vocabulary sheets, spelling exercises, reading comprehension worksheets, math practice sheets, science or social studies sheets, end-of-unit practice sheets, or anything similar.  Textbooks can even be useful for this activity, as children can enter vocabulary, key terms, or important concepts. Encourage the child to use 10-20 words, depending on his or her age.
  5. In order to find words from the handout, use words in a word bank or glossary. If the handout doesn’t include a word bank or glossary, then use words that are specific to the concept, idea, or story.
  6. Before the child starts composing the story or poem, look at the word bank he or she created, and ask the child to:
    • double check that the words are all spelled correctly.
    • read the list silently to himself/herself.
    • make sure he or she knows the meaning of each word.
  7. Read the words in the word bank together, supporting the child with pronunciation, if necessary.
  8. Allow the child to do some creative writing, using the words in the word bank to write a poem or story that will “teach” the concept to the adult.   Encourage him or her to use the background, font, color, and layout of the work to support the concept or topic.  The focus should be fun—not stressful.  So if there isn’t a concept to be taught--if the words are just spelling words or something similar--then encourage the child to be as creative as possible.
  9. Share!  When the child is finished, have him or her read the final piece and answer any questions you have about the concept. Anything that needs clarification, research together!  If it is a silly poem or story, laugh together.  Print it out, or share it with friends and family by clicking the “Share it!” button at the top of the screen.  Hanging the final draft in a place where the child can see it and read it regularly will help to reinforce these important words or concepts.

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More Ideas To Try

  • Use words from a chapter in a book that the child is reading.  
  • As a pre-reading activity, have the child skim the next chapter of a given text and use those words the word bank.
  • As a study technique, have the child choose important words from a unit of study or section of a class text for the word bank.
  • Consider using words from several different subject areas and encourage the child to write a poem about his or her day at school.

 

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