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Activity

Special Memories & Significant Moments: Making an Electronic Scrapbook

 

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Special Memories & Significant Moments: Making an Electronic Scrapbook

Grades 9 – 12
Activity Time 1 to 3 hours, depending on the number of artifacts the teen wishes to include in his or her scrapbook, plus as much time as desired to add to it from time to time. (Can be completed over several days)
Activity Author

Jaime R. Wood

Jaime R. Wood

Portland, Oregon

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

Activity Description

Why This Is Helpful

 

Activity Description

High school is full of special memories and significant moments. In this activity, teens brainstorm a list of their favorite experiences in high school, turning them into an electronic scrapbook. Since the scrapbook is electronic, they can easily add to it, revise it, and share it with friends and family near and far.

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Why This Is Helpful

Technology has become an important and exciting aspect of our society. This activity helps teens practice using a variety of technologies such as PowerPoint, digital camera, scanner, and the Internet in order to create a high school scrapbook. Not only is this good practice using these technologies, but it also encourages analysis, imaginative thinking, and creative problem solving. Teens have to narrow their experiences to the most important, choose artifacts that accurately represent those experiences, and finally, they have to figure out how to move the artifacts from the physical to the virtual world.

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