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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Parent & Afterschool Resources

ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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Activity

Start Your Own Book Club

 

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Start Your Own Book Club

Grades 3 – 5
Activity Time 30 minutes to one hour, as often as they like!
Activity Author

Jaime R. Wood

Jaime R. Wood

Portland, Oregon

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

  • A group of readers-four to six is ideal, but any number can work
  • A book of the children's choice-ask everyone to bring a copy
  • Art supplies (e.g., notebook paper, pencils, crayons/markers, scissors, glue, construction paper, etc.)
  • Internet access
  • Links to Activities Online

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Here's What To Do

  1. Have the child invite three or four friends to start a book club.

  2. Take a look at some booklists to find a book that the group is interested in, or choose a book that everyone already wants to read:

3.  Help children set some guidelines for making the club run smoothly:

  • How often should they meet?
  • How much should they have read before each meeting?
  • Should everyone bring art supplies? If so, what kind?

4.  Each time they meet, they should have a discussion of the section of the book their book club has read. Encourage them to talk about what their favorite parts are, what is confusing, and what they think will happen next. Make sure all club members get a chance to talk and share their opinions.

5.  Once they finish their first book, have a group member choose the next book      or vote on which book would be most fun to read next, and let them continue their book adventures.

6.  Encourage the group to keep track of what they've read using a Reading Record.

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More Ideas To Try

  • After discussion, offer participants a number of activities related to their book that everyone can participate in. Here are some examples:
    • Make it online: Choose an online activity and have children take turns completing the tasks before printing out the final product.
    • Act it out: Have everyone choose a character from the story, and act out a scene from the chapter they are reading.
    • Write it out: Have everyone choose a character from the story, and write a letter to one of the other characters about what's happening in the story right now. When they're finished, exchange letters.   Use the Letter Generator (see also the Letter Generator Tips) or Postcard Creator (see also the Postcard Creator Tips).
    • Illustrate it: Have everyone choose a scene that they would like to draw using the art supplies.
    • Review it: Use the Favorite Book Review Form to keep track of the books you like the best.
    • Use examples: Go to the Global Book Club Web site for more activity ideas.
    • Create you own: Ask book club members to invent new ways to bring the book to life.

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Glossary

Discuss

 

Discussion is a natural way for children and teens to express or explain what they already know or what they are learning. When possible, let children and teens lead the direction of a discussion. Ask questions that lead to an extended response (“What do you think about…?” or “Why do you think…?”) rather than questions that might result in a yes or no or a simple answer.

Character

 

A person, animal, or object represented in a story or play.

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