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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Read for My Summer

Read for My Summer

Beat the summer heat with engaging activities from ReadWriteThink.org.

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Parent & Afterschool Resources

ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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HomeParent & Afterschool ResourcesActivities & Projects

Activity

Summer Discoveries

 

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Summer Discoveries

Grades K – 3
Activity Time 30 to 60 minutes
Publisher International Reading Association
 

What You Need

Here’s What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

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Here’s What To Do

  1. Familiarize yourself with the interactive Acrostic Poems tool.

  2. Before you read Froggy Goes to Hawaii or Ladybug Girl at the Beach, talk with the child about day trips and vacations you have taken and how they often give us a chance to try something new.

  3. Read the picture book together aloud.

    Find Froggy Goes to Hawaii or Ladybug Girl at the Beach at your local library or book coveronline at www.wegivebooks.org. Create a free account by clicking “Join” at the top of the homepage. Once logged in, click “Read” in the top header and then search for the title you’d like to read online.

  4. After reading, look through one or both books again with the child. Ask what new discoveries Froggy or book coverLadybug Girl made. What did the characters see, hear, taste, or do on their trips? Tell the child that you’ll work together to write a poem about one of those discoveries.

  5. Open the interactive Acrostic Poems. The tool will ask the child’s first name and then ask for the topic word that will be used as the foundation for the poem. Select a topic word from one of the books. If the child chose wave, he or she would then have to construct a four-line poem using the W, A, V, and E as starting letters.

  6. Use the brainstorming step in the Acrostic Poems tool. In this step, you and the child can come up with words that describe or remind you of the topic word.(Don’t worry yet if these words don’t start with the letters of the topic word.)

  7. Next, the Acrostic Poems tool lists the topic word vertically, with a line next to each letter for the child to select words for each line of the poem. Remember that the child isn’t limited to just one word per line. For example, your poem could read:

    Water rushes
    At me on
    Vacation
    Exciting day

    Consider writing the poem from the point of view of the book characters. For instance, how would Ladybug Girl remember the waves?

  8. As a final step, ask the child to read the final poem aloud to reinforce that poetry does not need to rhyme.

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More Ideas To Try

  • Redo the acrostic poem activity but use words from the child’s own summer firsts. What did he or she learn to do last summer—swim, do a cartwheel, or make lemonade? Build an acrostic poem around those new experiences.

  • Do the acrostic poem activity using the child’s first name. Did you do this when you were a kid? Consider writing an acrostic poem of your name as a model. Or let the child try Mom, Dad, or Grandma.

  • Take this idea on the road: Keep it simple and do an acrostic poem without the online tool. When you’re in the car or looking for a boredom buster, choose a three-letter word, like dog. Can you and the child come up with words that start with D-O-G?

    Delightful is
    Our crazy but
    Great dog

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Glossary

Character

 

A person, animal, or object represented in a story or play.

Point of view

 

The angle from which an author tells a story using characters, events, and ideas. Stories can be told from an omniscient point of view, where the person telling the story sees and knows everything, or from a limited point of view, where the reader only sees, hears, or knows what a certain narrator does. Some stories use different points of view at different points in the story.

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