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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more.

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Activity

Go Ape with Webcams!

 

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Go Ape with Webcams!

Grades 3 – 5
Activity Time 20 or more minutes a day, as often as desired
Activity Author

Lisa Storm Fink

Lisa Storm Fink

Urbana, Illinois

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

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Here's What To Do

  1. Find Ape Adventures at your local library or online at www.wegivebooks.org. book coverCreate a free account by clicking "Join" at the top of the homepage. Once logged in, click "Read" in the top header and then search for the title you'd like to read online, Ape Adventures.

  2. Read Ape Adventures together or other book about animals, paying special attention to the pictures, captions, definitions and glossary. Take notes as needed. Discuss the facts that were learned about apes.

  3. While reading about an animal helps us learn, seeing one is even better! Take a look at the Ape Webcam from the San Diego Zoo.

  4. Choose together another type of animal to learn more about by viewing their habits and behavior on a webcam.

  5. Explore the Sites with Webcams, and choose the ones that will work best with your children. Note when the zoo indicates that the animals featured on the camera are typically active. Be prepared to choose an alternate camera if no animals appear within a reasonable length of time or if the Webcam is unavailable for some reason.

  6. Once a site is selected, gather children around the computer monitor so that everyone is able to see.

  7. Ask them to explain what they see on the Webcam display:

    • What is the animal doing?
    • What do you notice about the animal's habitat?
    • How does the animal move?
    • How does the animal interact with others?
    • What else do you think the animal does in this habitat?
    • What do you notice when you look closely at the images?
    • What would a scientist notice about this animal?
  8. View the scenes from the Webcam once a day or several times during the day.  Compare what is the same and what is different. If children are viewing multiple locations, compare how similar animals act differently in the different places. Ask the child what questions s/e has about the animal.

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More Ideas To Try

  • An option instead of Webcams is for children to complete similar activities by observing a pet, animals at home or the zoo, or a birdfeeder or squirrel feeder outside the window or at a nearby park.

  • Invite children to draw pictures of what they have observed.

  • If the children are interested in writing about what they have seen, encourage them to write it down in a notebook or using the Animal Webcam Observation Worksheet.

  • Watching the animals can lead children to ask questions about the animals or their habitats.  You can introduce nonfiction books and videos that children can use to look for additional information. Working together, you could search online, visit the library or search the resources you have available at home.

  • To conclude the project, invite children to write all they learned about the animals in a notebook, on paper or using the Animal Webcam Observation Summary.  Children can also create their own recording forms that match the animals they are observing.

  • Take virtual fieldtrips to other places of interest, such as museums and galleries that have online exhibits.

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Glossary

Observe

 

When children and teens observe, they may be following a formal process with a checklist of things to look for, or they may be exploring such a new experience that they can ask questions only after observing. Either way, observing should involve children and teens in the process of watching something closely, asking questions, and discussing what they have seen.

Discuss

 

Discussion is a natural way for children and teens to express or explain what they already know or what they are learning. When possible, let children and teens lead the direction of a discussion. Ask questions that lead to an extended response (“What do you think about…?” or “Why do you think…?”) rather than questions that might result in a yes or no or a simple answer.

Research

 

Researching a topic or question can take many different forms, from year-long studies resulting in publication to a quick search of available resources on the Internet. For these activities, we refer to research in the informal sense, using readily available resources (Internet, magazines, books, interviews, etc.) to answer questions.

Nonfiction

 

Writing based in fact that is designed to explain, argue, or describe.

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