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Episode 8 — Guys Read

 

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Chatting About Books: Recommendations for Young Readers

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Grades K – 5
Podcast Series Chatting About Books: Recommendations for Young Readers
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Duration 16:15
Original Air Date Published November 05, 2008
 

Book Chat

Cookies and Milk

Expert Chat

 

Book Chat

  • Smash! Crash! written by Jon Scieszka; illustrated by David Shannon, Loren Long, and David Gordon (Simon & Schuster, 2008)

    Introducing…the Trucktown gang! Smash! Crash! is the first book in the Trucktown series. In this book, Jack Truck and Dump Truck Dan are looking for someone to smash and crash with. Unfortunately, all of their friends are busy and don’t have time to smash and crash. Jack and Dan are also on the run from the large shadow following them. Who is it? Are Jack and Dan in trouble? I won’t spoil the ending, but it does involve plenty of smashing and crashing. This book is sure to be a SMASH with young readers.
    Best for ages 2–8.

    Guys Read

    John Scieszka's Trucktown

    John Scieszka Worldwide

Cookies and Milk

Emily enjoys cookies and milk with brothers Kosi and Kenyan and their mom Jenequa. These two guys definitely enjoy reading. They share their thoughts on a few of Jon Scieszka’s books along with other authors and topics that get them excited about reading. Jenequa offers insights into reading with her boys and how she motivates and encourages their reading.

Expert Chat

Hilarious children’s book author Jon Scieszka explains how 4-year-olds in a Brooklyn preschool inspired the characters in his new book, Smash! Crash!. He also offers tips for parents and teachers on how to motivate guys to read and talks about his new book Knucklehead, a collection of anecdotes and “tall tales” from his own life.