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Tips for Teens Writing a Children's Picture Storybook

 

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Tips for Teens Writing a Children's Picture Storybook

Grades 9 – 12
Type Learning New Skills
Tips for Teens Writing a Children's Picture Storybook
 

As young adults begin to explore different kinds of writing, it is important to understand what makes certain genres of books enjoyable for their readers.  This printout helps young writers focus on characteristics of well-written children's picture storybooks and what makes them unique.

How to Use This Printout

More Ideas to Try

 

How to Use This Printout

Help the young adult with whom you are working learn to write children's picture books by understanding what makes a book intriguing for kids.  Use this printout for guiding ideas to write children's picture storybooks on a variety of topics.

  1. Find a variety of children's picture storybooks that interest the young adult that you are working with, or that he/she remembers reading as a child. Allow him/her to read/reread these books and discuss the differences in the voice and writing style of the authors.
  2. Print one or more copies of the "Tips for Teens Writing a Children's Picture Storybook" printable and make it available to the young adult(s) with whom you are working. Ask him/her to look through the list of bullets that describe a well-written picture storybook, and ask him/her if he/she saw any of these characteristics in the books that he/she read.
  3. Have the child make notes next to the bullets about which books did an especially good job of following each of the specific characteristics of good children's picture storybooks.
  4. Discuss with the young adult the notes he/she took and also discuss how he/she thinks that the books he/she read could be improved using any of the characteristics from the printable that the author did not already use.

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More Ideas to Try

  • Have the adolescent with whom you are working begin to brainstorm ideas for their own children's picture storybook. Discuss his/her ideas and the tips on the printable to decide what will help make the book unique and well-written. Allow the teen to begin working on writing the book, and refer back to the tips printable throughout the writing process to review and revise the book.

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