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What I've Read

 

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What I've Read

Grades 3 – 5
Type Charting Progress
What I've Read
 

Young children can use this chart to keep track of the books, stories, and magazine articles that they read. This organizer will also help them see differences in genres of different texts and begin to formulate opinions about the texts they read.

How to Use This Printout

More Ideas to Try

 

How to Use This Printout

Instill a love for reading by encouraging children to read books and magazine articles and to keep track of their reading. Children will begin to formulate opinions and ideas about different texts and genres that they read. Completing this chart will also help children evaluate what they read and explain to you how they rate each book.

  1. Print one or more copies of the "What I've Read" chart and make it available to the child or children with whom you are working. For each book or magazine article that they read, ask them to write an entry including the title, author, illustrator, reading date, and genre.
  2. Ask the child to evaluate each book or magazine article by writing in words what they did or did not like about each text and why they did or did not like it.
  3. Talk to your child about why she rated each book or article the way she did.

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More Ideas to Try

  • Discuss with the child why he or she did or did not like certain texts. Talk about the similarities and differences in the texts that he/she read and why he/she may have liked some more than others.
  • Ask children to share with you the connections that they make with their reading. Does a character in the book remind them of someone they know? Does the setting of the book remind them of somewhere they have been? Talking about these connections help children reflect more thoughtfully about their reading and discover how books relate to their own life experiences.
  • Encourage the child to share their book recommendations with friends and family. He or she could ask people for recommendations, as well, and add them to his/her chart.
  • Challenge children to read a certain number of books, stories, or magazine articles in a given time period. When children achieve their goals, reward them with a trip to the book store to choose a book of their own to keep.

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