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Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Learn All Year Long

Kids and teens should read and write even when they are out of school. Why is this so important?

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Tip

Tackle the Summer Reading List Together

 

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Tackle the Summer Reading List Together

Grades 4 – 8
Publisher

International Reading Association

Tip Topic Tips for Reading To or With Kids
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Why Use This Tip

What to Do

 

Why Use This Tip

The lazy days of summer vacation can have an unexpected consequence, which is that children may lose ground on their reading skills. For this reason, many schools provide recommended or required reading lists for students. These tips will help a child tackle his or her summer reading list and have fun doing it.

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What to Do

  1. Go over the summer reading list with the child and help him or her select what books to read if choice is allowed. Using a calendar, map out a reading schedule so that the child is reading throughout the summer, instead of cramming in all the books at summer’s end. Keep the schedule lively by alternating different types of books. Have the child write the schedule in the calendar. To keep things fun, you might give him or her stickers to put on the calendar each time he or she finishes a book.

  2. Set a regular reading time, for example, after breakfast or before bed. Make sure the TV is off at this time to prevent distractions. If possible, act as a role model by reading during this time, too.

  3. You can also encourage the child to read during “empty” times, such as when traveling, lying around at the pool, or any time when the child says he or she is “bored.” Audio books are good options if your vacation involves a long car trip. Your entire family will enjoy one of the books and the child can check it off his or her reading list.

  4. Get an extra copy of some of the books and read it with the child. Read it at the same pace and share your thoughts or ask the child questions as you go. A lively discussion will help the child remember the books later on.

  5. Many classic and popular books have been made into movies. After the child has finished reading a book, watch the movie together. Discuss the differences between the two: What worked and what didn’t work in the movie, what elements got cut and what scenes got added, whether the movie stayed true to the book, and what the differences in dialogue were.

  6. Have the child keep a reading response journal where he or she writes about the books. There doesn’t have to be a set format, but prompts for writing might include the following:

    • I didn’t understand…
    • I liked/didn’t like…
    • My favorite part/character/scene was…
    • It reminded me of…
  7. Children can also use the Reading Record to respond to and keep track of the books they read.

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