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Poets in Practice

Grades   3 – 8  |  Professional Library

Poets in Practice

This article discusses the need to engage students and teachers in active poetry writing.

 

Talking in Class: Using Discussion to Enhance Teaching and Learning

Grades   9 – 12  |  Professional Library

Talking in Class: Using Discussion to Enhance Teaching and Learning

The authors guide high school teachers in developing skills in promoting and facilitating authentic discussion in the English language arts classroom.

 

Being and Becoming: Multilingual Writers’ Practices

Grades   K – 8  |  Professional Library

Being and Becoming: Multilingual Writers’ Practices

This study examines the writing practices taken on and negotiated by multilingual class members within two multiage elementary classrooms.

 

Literature, Literacy, and Comprehension Strategies in the Elementary School

Grades   K – 8  |  Professional Library

Literature, Literacy, and Comprehension Strategies in the Elementary School

Joy F. Moss focuses on literature units structured around read-aloud/think-aloud group sessions in which students collaborate to construct meaning.

 

Text Complexity: Raising Rigor in Reading

Grades   4 – 12  |  Professional Library

Text Complexity: Raising Rigor in Reading

Selecting appropriate reading material for students is hard. For decades, teachers have known that quality instruction requires a careful matching of materials to students. The goal is to select materials that are neither too difficult nor too easy for students--a phenomenon sometimes called the Goldilocks Rule.