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Journal > Voices from the Middle

Finding the Thread: Character, Setting, and Theme

by Teri Lesesne

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Finding the Thread: Character, Setting, and Theme

Grades 5 – 9
Type Journal
Published September 2000
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English

 

Description  

An annotated bibliography of books that exemplify the plot elements, character, setting, and theme. Includes guidelines on how to do a book talk.

 

Lesesne, Teri. "Finding the Thread: Character, Setting, and Theme." Voices from the Middle 8.1 (September 2000):78-84.

 

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