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Happily Ever After: Sharing Folk Literature With Elementary and Middle School Students

by Terrell A. Young

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Happily Ever After: Sharing Folk Literature With Elementary and Middle School Students

Grades 3 – 8
Type Book
Pages 360
Published January 2004
Publisher International Reading Association

 

Description  

As an instructional tool, folk literature can foster literacy, promote cultural awareness, and create connections with the content areas. Yet few resources provide background about folk literature and how to use it your classroom.

Happily Ever After fills this gap with reader-friendly chapters that define folk literature and its subgenres, provide strategies for using folklore across the curriculum, and describe techniques for teaching students to write their own folk stories. Contributors to the volume offer a variety of perspectives and approaches that make the book relevant to teachers, teacher educators, librarians, and administrators.

 

Young, T.A. (Ed.). (2004). Happily Ever After: Sharing Folk Literature With Elementary and Middle School Students. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

 

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