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Preventing Plagiarism: Tips and Techniques

by Laura Hennessey DeSena

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Preventing Plagiarism: Tips and Techniques

Grades 9 – 12
Type Book
Pages 117
Published January 2007
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English

 

Description  

DeSena offers a practical guide on how high school and college teachers can structure assignments and guide students so that students don't plagiarize.

Free Sample Chapter

Table of Contents

 

DeSena, Laura Hennessey.  2007. Preventing Plagiarism: Tips and Techniques. (Chapter 2). Urbana, IL:  NCTE.

 

Related Resources

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Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing

Students investigate issues of plagiarism, fair use, and paraphrasing using KWL charts, discussion, and practice.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Students as Creators: Exploring Copyright

This lesson gives students the tools they need to consider the ethical issues surrounding use and ownership of copyrighted materials.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Technology and Copyright Law: A “Futurespective”

Students research and report on instances of how copyright laws have adapted to encompass new technologies. They write articles predicting copyright issues that may arise with new and future technologies.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Copyright Law: From Digital Reprints to Downloads

Students investigate how and why copyright law has changed over time, and apply this information to recent copyright issues, creating persuasive arguments based on the perspective of a particular group.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Campaigning for Fair Use: Public Service Announcements on Copyright Awareness

Students explore a range of resources on fair use and copyright then design their own audio public service announcements (PSAs), to be broadcast over the school’s public address system.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Copyright Infringement or Not? The Debate over Downloading Music

This lesson takes advantage of students’ interest in music and audio sharing. Students investigate multiple perspectives in the music downloading debate and develop a persuasive argument for a classroom debate.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Research Building Blocks: “Cite Those Sources!”

Students learn the importance of crediting others for their words and ideas, and then learn the paraphrasing and citation skills necessary to avoid plagiarism.

 

Grades   6 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Minilesson

Prove It!: A Citation Scavenger Hunt

Students are challenged to find citations that support details about the characters, plot, or themes from a text.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Creative Outlining-From Freewriting to Formalizing

After reading a short story, students use freewriting as a catalyst for a literary analysis essay.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

The Ten-Minute Play: Encouraging Original Response to Challenging Texts

Students use both analytical and creative skills to adapt passages from a novel with significant internal dialogue and conflict, such as Toni Morrison’s Beloved, into a ten-minute play.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Modeling Academic Writing Through Scholarly Article Presentations

Students prepare an already published scholarly article for presentation, with an emphasis on identification of the author’s thesis and argument structure.