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Journal > Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy

Rereadings and Literacy: How Students' Second Readings Might Open Third Spaces

by Tom Lynch

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Rereadings and Literacy: How Students' Second Readings Might Open Third Spaces

Grades 9 – 12
Type Journal
Published December 2008
Publisher International Reading Association

 

Description  

A secondary English teacher tells how he and his students confronted the question, How do we reclaim the joy of reading? After admitting that they didn't read very much for his assignments, the students were invited to help figure out where the joy of reading goes as students grow older. As the teacher and students discussed their experiences as readers, they studied essays edited by Anne Fadiman in her book, Rereadings. In these essays, writers reflected on their pasts and current lives as readers by rereading a book from years ago. The essays are part literary criticism, part memoir, and part author biography—and they offer much insight about students and their literary lives. The author recreates dialogue from classroom discussions, unpacks examples of student work, provides practical insights for other educators, and offers a theoretical framework within which one might consider Rereading essays in one's own classroom.

Lynch, T. (2008, December). Rereadings and Literacy: How Students' Second Readings Might Open Third Spaces. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 52(4), 334–341. doi: 10.1598/JAAL.52.4.6

 

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Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

I Remember That Book: Rereading as a Critical Investigation

Curl up with a good book again—or not. In this lesson, students brainstorm why they reread some books, while passing up others, and write their reflections in an essay.