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Book

New Visions for Linking Literature and Mathematics

by David Whitin and Phyllis Whitin

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New Visions for Linking Literature and Mathematics

Grades K – 6
Type Book
Pages 171
Published February 2004
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English

 

Description  

David and Phyllis Whitin offer K-6 teachers a wealth of ideas for integrating literature and mathematics.

Free Sample Chapter

Table of Contents

 

Whitin, David J. & Phyllis Whitin. 2004. New Visions for Linking Literature and Mathematics. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English; and Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

 

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Bridging Literature and Mathematics by Visualizing Mathematical Concepts

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