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Strategy Guide

Teaching With Glogster: Using Virtual Posters in the Classroom

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Teaching With Glogster: Using Virtual Posters in the Classroom

Grades 3 – 12
Authors

Rachel Karchmer-Klein, Ph.D.

Rachel Karchmer-Klein, Ph.D.

Newark, Delaware

Valerie Shinas, Ph.D.

Valerie Shinas, Ph.D.

Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

Publisher

International Reading Association

Strategy Guide Series Teaching with Technology

See All Strategy Guides in this series 

 

Research Basis

Strategy in Practice

Related Resources

Glogster is a Web 2.0 tool that allows users to create virtual posters combining text, audio, video, images, and hyperlinks and to share them with others electronically. Using Glogster’s educational site, Glogster EDU, teachers can establish class lists and monitor student activity while protecting privacy and anonymity.

Research Basis

 

The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies (2008) states students must be capable of designing and sharing digital information. Similarly, the IRA position statement, New Literacies and 21st Century Technologies, recommends the integration of digital tools into classroom activities, emphasizing the teachers’ responsibility to prepare students to use digital media effectively. The current generation of Internet technologies, Web 2.0 tools, facilitate interactive information sharing in collaborative digital environments. Their use in educational settings has increased dramatically in recent years due to the development of educational versions specifically designed for student and teacher use.  Importantly, research indicates that web-based tools can support student learning, specifically the development of critical reading skills and the ability to evaluate online texts, and provide opportunities for students to write texts for authentic purposes (Handsfield, Dean, & Cielocha, 2009; Larson, 2010; Zawilinski, 2009).

 

Handsfield, L.J., Dean, T.R., & Cielocha, K.M. (2009). Becoming critical consumers and producers of text: Teaching literacy with Web 1.0 and Web 2.0. The Reading Teacher, 63(1), pp. 40–50.

 

Larson, L.C. (2010). Digital readers: The next chapter in e-book reading and response. The Reading Teacher, 64(1),15-22.

 

Zawilinski, L. (2009). HOT blogging: A framework for blogging to promote higher-order thinking. The Reading Teacher, 62(8), pp. 650–661.

 

Strategy in Practice

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  • Glogster is a Web 2.0 tool that allows users to create virtual posters combining linked or embedded text, video, images, and music. Glogster can be used in educational settings as an alternative to traditional poster presentations (see Glogs: Virtual Online Posters).
  • Users may find Glogster difficult to navigate. Familiarize yourself with Glogster before introducing it to students. The short video Glogster Tutorial provides a detailed, step-by-step introduction to Glogster EDU.
  • Tips for use appear at the bottom of the glog editing screen and educational resources are available on the Glogster EDU homepage.
  • Glogster is a social networking site; special permission may be needed to use it in the classroom. Check your district’s technology policies.
  • Register for the education version of Glogster at Glogster EDU. After you receive e-mail confirmation, you can create up to 200 numbered student accounts.
  • Preview examples of glogs from Glogpedia, a collection of the best Glogs available at Glogster EDU.
  • Create a step-by-step tutorial for students or use one such as Glog On! to teach your students how to create a glog. Provide students with ample opportunities to practice using Glogster.
  • Teach students to create a glog using a think-aloud approach; model the importance of selecting appropriate features, organizing the elements with the reader in mind, and developing ideas using multiple modes. Model for students how to use images and graphics to guide the reader.
  • Develop a scoring rubric to assess students’ glogs; consider technical considerations such as the use of features as well as the quality, relevance, and organization of the elements. For inspiration, view a sample Glog Rubric.
  • Provide support and scaffolding for students who may have difficulty finding appropriate images or media files to incorporate into their glogs.

Related Resources

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